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"Where do I come from?"

Translation:Unde venio?

September 12, 2019

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrodToward

Whence come I? Alas, I know not, but all I know is that I must persevere!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

There's no "a/ab", showing the origin of the move, so how to know if it's Where do I come from, or Where do I go?

How would be "Where I go?"

I tried to guess, but I need to know if I'm right. There are several verbs for describing someone going from a place to another place.

Vadere = verb. to go, to walk, to advance.
Ire = verb. to go toward a direction.
Venire = to arrive, to come, to go.

Please, someone tells me if it's very accurate.
So, I guess that "venire" is like "venir" in French (There's also a "venir" in Spanish, and a venire in Italian, but the meaning seems a bit different, maybe?)

So aller in French is to go (go to).
And venir is to come (come from).

Is it like this in Latin, is "venire" imply somewhat "from", even if we use the preposition "a/ab" in the sentence, when there's a complement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YamirRomer

Hi Perce. In this case "unde venio" in spanish would be "De donde vengo" whether it is confirmation or question (a question mark or entonation does help) anyway. "Vengo" is the conjugation for the first person of the verb "to come". So in english would be "where do i come from? Or where i do come from". The verb "to go" is not involved in this phrase. I hope this does help you to clarify.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

In this case "unde venio" in spanish would be "De donde vengo"

Which is interesting historically speaking, since donde originally comes from DE UNDE (literally, "from from where?"), so de donde? is etymologically "from from from where?".

But of course, etymology is not always a guide to what words mean in a modern language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

Etymology can be really interesting. The English "children" came from stacking two different plural endings. It was initially "cild" singular and "cildru" plural, but then by analogy with the declension that produced "ox/oxen" it became "cildruen". And the French "aujourd'hui" breaks down into "on the day of this day" if you trace its etymology.

But as you say, etymology does not dictate what it means now. It's just the historical path it took to get here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krista189497

I think it is like that: when you go into the city (or anywhere else) the object becomes Accusative (ending) If you come from the city ( or somewhere the object is in Ablative (ending of the noun)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jlseymour3

Except it gives us urbe venio for i am coming into the city. I am wondering if * mean "from where"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jlseymour3

*unde. (I couldn't remember the word and on my phone I can't see the top of the discussion while writing my comment or edit the comment)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

Unde = Whence Ubi = Where Quo = Whither Venio = I come Eo = I go


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteCymru14

I incorrectly wrote 'Unde venit' for this and the answer was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jlseymour3

I've noticed that it is excessively accepting of errors. Clear typos is one thing, but getting the verb endings right is pretty key and the wron verb shouldn't be accepted. I've commented on that, hopefully they fix it. For now I have to check the discussion to see the right answer, even if it makes me as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2617

Commenting in the forums does nothing. You'd need to flag it in the lesson itself and report from there. However, the course contributors have no control over how the correction algorithm works. You would need to take this up with the devs.
https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/sections/200864570-Reporting-Issues


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poiuytl

What's wrong with leniency? At least you are informed you've made an error. Wanting to lose a heart over every error is like begging for punishment. Wanting to see that smartass crying owl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

I guess it also corrected the typo in the solution. Have you reported it? There should be a specific option for that, something like "the solution has an error"...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe324510

"Unde ab venio" Isn't acceptable? When you hover over the words it says that the English translates to "Unde" "venio" "ab". But this is marked as an error.

When is the correct time to use "ab"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaeci11

Wouldn't you know where you came from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2617

Maybe they're adopted and want to learn about their birth parents.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

Ubi ==> static location

Quo ==> motion toward

Unde ==> motion away from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ioaemcl

Thank you, that is the answer I came here for. Super useful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViolaM9d

Why is it wrong to include the first person singular pronoun: ego? Is it always and ONLY known from the verb conjugation? I was marked wrong for: Unde venio ego.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YamirRomer

There's nothing wrong. it is just not necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schrodinger95

Why not Unde a venio?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

"Unde" already means "whence/from where".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jigglymind

Why wasnt "ego unde venio" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

In questions, the question word comes first, followed by the thing being questioned: Unde venio? The subject pronoun is generally optional, and in statement form the subject generally comes before the verb. I think in question form either way works: Unde ego venio? Unde venio ego?

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