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  5. "My grandma is seventy-five y…

"My grandma is seventy-five years old."

Translation:He kanahikukūmālima makahiki o koʻu tūtū.

September 12, 2019

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jules730827

Why can't you say 'tutu wahine'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephanos14021

You can say it. But Duolingo has not entered that in its system as one of the correct answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I think because they used "grandma" instead of "grandmother."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDeLan394537

There are other lessons where you get marked wrong for using "tūtū" for "grandma" instead of "tūtū wahine. Consistency would be nice...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

I added wahine because I thought otherwise tūtū might might mean grandpa and be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Yeah, me too. I think culturally, Tūtū is the name most often given to grandmothers, and is not often used when referring to grandfathers. So DL, and the general community, think of tūtū as grandmother when used by itself without the gender spec.

"Ahwen visit my tūtū" strongly implies "I just spent some time with my grandmother."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HklaniClee

Among native speakers, tūtū is also common for "grandpa." Niʻihau speakers use tūtū for either gender, and only add wahine or kāne if there may be some confusion about which is being referred to. If the name is provided, as would be common in general conversation, no need for gender reference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I am so glad you decided to join us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

Sounds right. I've always wondered, btw, why the "t"s are preserved in this word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Is it not proper to translate seventy five to kanahikukūmamālima?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

Looks correct to me. Maybe they just haven't gotten around to putting it in the key yet. I would have reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

I tried using "O ko'u tūtū o kanahikukūmālima makahiki" because ko'u tūtū is the subject, but that's wrong here. What's the difference??? I have SO far to go before this language becomes my own!! =(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I see. It is because it is not the grandma of 75 years. It is the 75 years of grandma. In other words, we are talking about the 75 years that grandma "owns." It is not the years that own grandma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme721848

Excellent point (the extra ma). The DL spelling gives no reply in wehewehe or manomano. In fact the spelling you give here does not work either. It does come up as the correct answer in google translate though. Does this mean that all the spellings used in DL are wrong? Mahalo e rabelon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iolani953768

Tutu wahine is as acceptable as tutu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Absolutely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MojaveMama

He kanahikukūmālima makahiki o koʻu tūtū wahine.

still not accepted

09/14/20

c'mon DL....update please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Or 11 March 2021 - so I'll report it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil89554

what is wrong with: He kanahikukūmamālima makahiki o koʻu tūtū wahine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MojaveMama

Absolutely nothing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elensaar

Could "kuʻu tūtū" be correct if you are fond of your grandma?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MojaveMama

Absolutely. Have a listen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHaPFzMeBCY

"Aloha au i kuʻu tūtū lā I ka nui loko maikaʻi E lohe mau ia ana la Kona leo heahea"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ddeeb

Why is it "o" and not "a" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Because the relationship of the grandmother to the grandchild is an o-class relationship. The grandparent would refer to the grandchild as an a-class relationship.

Ko'u kupuna = "My grandparent"
Ka'u mo'opuna = "My grandchild"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme721848

Why is the “o” needed here? I thought all the other examples omitted it.

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