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  5. "That Corinna sings sweetly."

"That Corinna sings sweetly."

Translation:Illa Corinna suaviter cantat.

September 13, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timotheus_Sum

Why is not "Haec Corinna suaviter cantat" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lescouleurs

What I understood is that

  • haec = feminine form of hic ( this / these )
  • illa = feminine form of ille ( that / those )

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenBrown958

Why not "Corinna illa ....."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PNyvlt
  • 1277

This was my first choice too. A quick search shows Cicero uses ille in both positions: "in illa tranqulitate", but also "auditor Panaetii illius" and " Medea illa". Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

I believe this is not commonly used. See "this thing" vs "thing, this" in English for example, so the determiner comes before the noun.

I don't know how often romans used appositions, perhaps not at all, but this is just how it would look like: Corinna, illa puella (haec puella non est), suaviter cantat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyihsin

Why not "Ista Corinna..."? In English, saying "That Corinna" sounds a little deprecating, just like "ista" in Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

"That Corinna" is just pointing out that the subject is that one, far from the speaker, and not this one, nearby.

In my view, iste/ista suddenly alone in fact sounds like treating the subject as any object rather than a being, like saying "this one" in english, and mostly any other language.

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