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  5. "My book is my teacher."

"My book is my teacher."

Translation:Liber meus est magister meus.

September 16, 2019

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

Why is it all nominative? Is it due to the verb est (is), indicating that the teacher as well as the book is the subject of the sentence. I've forgotten this part of grammar since school. If it had been "My book was read by my teacher", then "the book" would have been accusative, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"My teacher read the book."
What was read? What received the action of the verb?
The book -- accusative

And as you can see, only the direct object of a transitive verb can be promoted to the subject in a passive construction.
"The book was read (by my teacher)."

"My book is my teacher."
There is no action here. Transitivity only applies to active verbs. "To be/esse" is a stative verb, which means it takes subject complements, which are also in the nominative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

Thank you! There was something called predikatsfyllnad in Swedish grammar, "predicative" in English, which seems to be closely related to the "subject complement" you write about. Now I remember!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The predicate is just the rest of the sentence after the subject, but there is such a thing as the predicate nominative, which is what's going on here: the nominative in the predicate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akifbulut

duo est magister meus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

Application meus est magister meus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

Applicatio mea est magistra mea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard125577

Yeah, but ... My Latin is really rusty (which is why I'm doing this), but things come back to me. "Real" Latin generally drops the forms of the verb 'to be' in equative clauses like this, right? Liber meus magister meus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

Latin would often use Dative constructions for phrases like this, but it was not accepted (Dec. 2020);

"Liber meus magister mihi est"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Next time, flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lars205292

Why is Liber meus magister meus not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

The verb est ("is") is missing in your translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lars205292

I know, but since this is a sort of parable I don't think the 'est' is necessary here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

I guess you could say that in English as well: "My book... my teacher", and likely in Latin (I'm just guessing).

But Duolingo expects you to write a Latin translation that corresponds as close as possible to the English one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EthanRossi2

Why is "magistrum" not an acceptable answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

magistrum is the accusative case and would be used if an action was being performed upon the book. No action is being performed on the teacher here, rather est links liber and magister together, just saying they are the same thing.

There are some other explanations of this in this discussion if you need more clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

Have a look at my question Above, beginning with the question "Why is it all nominative". That is in essense the same question as you have and "Rae.F" answers this. It has to do with the verb not being an active one. There is no one performing an action with the book such as reading.

(Edit: Sorry, Moopish, for duplicating – I wrote this while you added your answer.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zan516131

Two -er nouns with -us adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case, but they have their own declensions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pnf408

would "magistra mea" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THPAX

Apparently not. I think that it's because meus is for masculine and mea is for feminine.

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