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  5. "Venti silvas perflant."

"Venti silvas perflant."

Translation:The winds blow through the forests.

September 17, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulouF

Perflare is both intransitive (blow all around) and transitive (blow through [something]). Here it's transitive. We should get duolingo explaining clues though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fekundulo

Why not "Venti per silvas perflant"? I read here "winds blow the forests".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

The through is contained in the "per" of "perflant"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan.C.Lungescu

A previous sentence was “Ventus iratus per villam perflat”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

The first conjugation perflare does not double down with the preposition. DL should remove 'per" from Venti per villam perflant in the next iteration as in this example. Note Vulgate Song 4:16 perfla hortum meum, "blow through my garden." (With the third conjugation perfluere in Lucretius 2.391-392, where we find the poetic juxtaposition of 'per colum vina videmus' with 'perfluere' in subsequent lines, one must take into consideration the poetic meter and that it is a different conjugation.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aladdinjersey

Is the difference because perflare is transitive and perfluere is intransitive, or is it because of different declension?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamillaCSN

Duolingo just taught me that my last name is forest. I love this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raplopez

Can silvas be translated as jungles? Because in spanish, selva means jungle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Good point to note the etymological connection with the Spanish; in both Spanish and Italian selva can still refer to a forest: http://etimologias.dechile.net/?selva


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Yes, because I do not believe that the Classical Romans ever encountered jungles, and they would have probably called them "forests" if they did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosBogers

When the word "villam" is used it has the word "per" but with "silvas" it doesn't: "Venti silvas perfant", "Venti per villam perflant".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aladdinjersey

This is irritating. How is Ventus per villam perflat different grammatically from Venti silvas perflant ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VerbumCaroFactum

Why no per here? It is frustrating to have to remember that sometimes the answers require it and sometimes they prohibit it. It would be different if it were optional, but I can see no pattern to when it is used and when it is not.

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