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  5. "Novum Eboracum est urbs."

"Novum Eboracum est urbs."

Translation:New York is a city.

September 17, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Many Latin clauses or phrases types have typical word order: Latin Word OrderVerb Positions • Latin Word Order ThoughtcoLatin Word Order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What do yo call "nominal"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Do you make a distinction between city and town, people? (I'm not a native). I know there's a distinction theorically. But in the reality of the use? And in Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaphos1

Town's small, city's big ;-) In Latin, urbs most commonly is THE city, Rome. Technically, the difference between urbs, civitas (any community/town/city/even state, comprised by "cives" citizens; whence Engl. city, btw.) and oppidum is by size.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristinaG697158

I'm trying to work out the logic but can't figure out what determines whether we use "Novi Eboraci" or "Novum Eboracum". Can anyone help please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tannuska

Novum Eboracum est urbs. Latin has declinations. Novum Eboracum is the Nominative case, and function as subjective. Novi Eboraci habito. It is translated by IN New York I live. Thus, Bostonia est urbs, but Familia mea BostoniAE habitat. Or, Philadelphia est urbs, but Quot iuvenes PhiladelphiAE sunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

This course is awfully obsessed with America so far. Lots of Novum Eboricum, Bostonia, and Philadelphia, but no Londinium or vetum Eboricum.

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