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"Their father is strict."

Translation:Pater eorum est severus.

September 18, 2019

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ekoi1995

Severus Snape severus est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theater_geek_04

Lol, that is actually how I remember it! I remember that Severus Snape is strict.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenMac741561

"Eorum pater severus est" was marked incorrect; why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TxyNTP

Seems to be fixed. I just wrote "eorum pater severus est" and was marked as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Report it. As "Mea culpa" does exist, "Eorum pater" should exist.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

No place to report it (with a button) except here: inexplicably, the form "eārum" for "their" is not accepted. But there's no context from which to determine whether "they" are all female (justifying eārum), or all male / mixed (requiring eōrum).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TxyNTP

Has anybody thought of "Illorum" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Illōrum/illārum should work just as well as eōrum/eārum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin353755

What is the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Illōrum is the genitive plural form for masculine or neuter: "of those men" / "of those things."

Illārum is the genitive plural form for feminine: "of those women."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin353755

Thanks! Although I was actually asking what is the difference between illorum and eorum?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Oh! sorry--and thanks for clarifying the question!!

There is not a huge difference between eōrum and illōrum , except that illōrum is somewhat more 'emphatic' and can be used in a couple of special ways.

They are alike in meaning "of them," "their" (referring to some masculine plural or neuter plural group under discussion).

eōrum is the genitive plural masc/neuter form of the ordinary, regular 3rd person pronoun (is, ea, id , "he, she, it").

illōrum is the genitive plural masc/neuter of the demonstrative pronoun/adjective (ille, illa, illud , "that"). So, in addition to meaning "of those [men/things under discussion]", which is not dramatically different from "of them", it can mean: "of those FAMOUS [men/things]" , or "of the FORMER [men/things under discussion]" , with an implied contrast to hōrum (the gen pl m/n of hic, haec, hoc , "this") meaning, "of the LATTER."

It's clear from the Romance languages that the ille, illa, illud word was eventually used so widely that it seems to have replaced is, ea, id as a 3rd person pronoun and as the source of the definite article (not used in Latin).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TxyNTP

Danke, ich versuch's mal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AttiamMat

Yes, it's the first that came up to my mind, since in italian "Their father is strict" translates to "Il loro padre è severo". I was asking myself if "eorum" and "illorum" are interchangeable in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monicalabbao

"Pater eorum severus est" was incorrect, I wonder why


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvisStulta05

Isn't "eorum" accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

"eōrum" is the genitive plural masculine (or neuter) form of the pronoun is, ea, id ("he, she, it"). -ōrum is the gen. pl. masc/neuter 2nd decl. ending. Translate it as "their" or "of them".

All the genitives plural have some kind of "m" ending: -ārum, -ōrum, -um/-ium, -uum, -ērum (that's for decl. 1-5 respectively).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikiUhlyar

it is normal for it to be genitive ... as it replies to the whose? question, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giuseppe297424

"severus est pater eorum" should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikiUhlyar

I agree ... it flows nicely, like the beginning of a (horror) story


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanychAZ

Earum is not accepted - why? Does "Their" now automatically mean only masculine objects?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

If "they" are all feminine, eārum would indeed make sense. Without context, we don't know the sex(es) of the "they" in question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikiUhlyar

I had 'est', the verb at the end got a green light ... which is better? If there is a better ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xavi_cpereira

Could it be "Pater eorum strictus est"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Apparently not; the Oxford Latin Dictionary has these definitions for strictus, a, um (the past participle of stringere , which means, among other things, to draw a sword): "compact, well-knit; closely packed, dense"; "terse" (of writings); "rigorous" of a judge or a law. One would guess that the meaning of "strict" in English, referring to people's conduct/attitudes, comes from this meaning.

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