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  5. "Ego domo eo."

"Ego domo eo."

Translation:I go from home.

September 19, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeritheGreedy

Which case is 'domo'? Without 'ab' does this mean it is a set phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Domo is ablative. It was common to express from a place with a bare ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Is there a version with the preposition "a"? "a domus" or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The word "house, home" (domus) is one of a few special words, plus the NAMES of cities, towns, small islands ( = only big enough for one city/town)--as distinct from the nouns "city, town, island"--that don't use the prepositions for directions (and location "in").

Accusative = motion towards (Like, "I'm going HOME" in English, vs. "I'm going to the office" or "to the store": so, HOME doesn't need the "to" or "towards" preposition in English either). So, Romam = to Rome.

Ablative = motion from. So, Roma (with long a) = from Rome.

"Locative" (the Romae / Bostoniae / Novi Eboraci that Duolingo teaches, for "I live in (place name of city)") is more complicated to describe. Here's what I tell my students:

all PLURAL place names: locative = same as ablative pl.

all 1st/2nd decl. SING place names: locative = same as gen. sing. (Novi Eboraci and Bostoniae are examples)

all 3rd decl. SING place names: locative = same as dat. sing. (or sometimes abl. sing.) . We don't have an example of one of these in Duolingo, so far as I've seen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dakkant

Many thanks for such a lucid explanation. Although the various forms of domus are implied in this and previous lessons, the notes did state that the ablative is only going to be used with a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Gratias tibi ago!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

We could say that the ablative is usually used following a preposition; but that, in certain specific situations, the ablative is used alone (no preposition). City-names plus a few other words, including domus, don't need a preposition to express "motion away from," just the ablative ending. The instrument with which the subject does an action ("beats them with a stick") is expressed by the ablative ending alone. A point in time ("at midnight," "at dawn," "at the sixth hour," "in summer") is expressed by the ablative ending alone. And so forth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

Could this also mean "I leave home", or does it strictly mean: I go from point A (to point B)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

In this example, we are given point A (= domo, from home), but not point B.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

Exactly. That's why I put it in brackets.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagisterLa

I reported this sentence but didn't see that the correct answer did, in fact, have "from" in it - please ignore!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juanpedro_24

Why isn't it "domum"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Domum is the opposite of domo: domum is (TO) home/homewards, while domo is (AWAY) from home.

If I'm at the store, then I can go home: (Ego) domum eo.

If I'm at home, but am going to go to the store: (Ego) domo eo.

Eo ("I go") + either of 2 directions: homewards = domum; from home = domo.

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