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  5. "Corinna comes into the city."

"Corinna comes into the city."

Translation:Corinna in urbem venit.

September 19, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karo71374

what's the difference between in urbem and ad urbem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

in urbem is more 'into the city' (going inside)

ad urbem is more 'towards the city' (movement towards)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

In urbem is accusative to mean "into the city", a motion-specific

In urbe is dative to mean "in the city", a motion-general

Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

urbe is ablative. in urbe specifies the location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gorn61

How does one know which noun ending goes with which preposition?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devonmonkey

With most prepositions, you use the accusative, but with a few prepositions, seen below, you use the ablative sine in de

sub pro ab, a cum ex,e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldYTKA

Can I say "In urbem venit Corinna"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffShep2

I am having a hard time figuring out when to us "it" or "is" ending for "you" verbage


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

-it -> third person singular : he or she or it is doing the action. Venit : 'he/she/it comes'

-is -> second person singular : you (one person) are doing the action. Venis : 'You (one person) come'

-itis -> second person plural : you (multiple people) are doing the action. Venitis : 'You (multiple people) come'

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