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"Placentne tibi patellae meae?"

Translation:Do you like my plates?

September 21, 2019

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R0dluvan

I didn't think we were actually going to your place to look at plates. They're nice plates though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonDeAlberta

My plates are on the floor -- right next to my etchings!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimatter162

Also on the floor. Watch your step-they're everywhere!


[deactivated user]

    I’m hearing “me-a-e” and not “me-ae”, where “ae” is a diphthong. I reported the audio as wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honcongensis

    I heard it the same way. and also placent' on my speakers sounded likelacent'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupercus1

    i heard papelae for patellae


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egcw1995

    Umbridge's office in the latin translation of the 4th Harry Potter book?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

    ..Yes I do, but why are they on the floor?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonDeAlberta

    To catch the thrown fish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

    In pavimento sunt, fractae tamen non sunt!! (proving that they're unbreakable!!)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

    . . . They're lovely. Now where did I leave that door?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

    Next to the drunk parrot sitting on a chair?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guizai2001

    can "patellae" in this sentence mean not only the plate itself, but the food? in portuguese, we often say like "lasagna is an italian 'plate'" (lasanha é um prato italiano), as in recipeit


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

    What a good question! A cursory study of the entry "patella" in the Oxford Latin Dictionary didn't show any examples of this (or I missed them). In English, we use "dish" that way: there's a dish (full) of food, and also "a delicious Italian dish."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisalbichon1

    I keep wanting to read "patellae" as 'knees,' whole different scenario...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

    The patella is our kneecap. It is only part of a knee.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tassie_Gorilla

    Do you like my kneecaps?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

    Ugh, I translated as if the patellae were nominative and therefore the subject of placent, and as if tibi were dative with the verb. So, I didn't use the English idiom preferred by Duolingo, but ... "Do my dishes please you?" would seem to carry the sense of the Latin.

    I tried it again, a week later--because it seems natural enough to me--but it's still not accepted.


    [deactivated user]

      You are right. That is what the Latin literally says. No “as if”. Patellae is nominative and the subject of placent, no matter how we translate it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisalbichon1

      Couldn't patella also mean 'kneecap' if the speaker is flirty?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

      Sisalbichon, you made remember me a film in which Brigitte Bardot asked to her man if he likes several parts of her body. But she didn’t ask about her knees!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChouTzuyu37918

      That's a weird thing to ask, "Do you like my plates?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

      But don’t throw them onto the floor !!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin751801

      Why is there such a hard stop in meae? I thought it was supposed to be a glide, but he read it like me'ae


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokoneu

      We need flirting lessons in Latin.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

      In Latin it isn’t


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

      Difference between tibi and vobis?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

      Singular and plural "you."

      If "you" = one person, the forms of the pronoun are (nomin), tibi (dative), (accus) and (abl.); the possessive adjective ("your") is tuus, tua, tuum .

      (Nomin = YOU, dative = TO / FOR YOU, accus. and abl. = YOU as object of preposition, etc.)

      If "you" = more than one person, then vōs is the nominative/accusative form, and vōbīs is the dative/ablative form.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipWoff1

      More into your bowls... if ya know what I mean.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goomy

      What's the difference between placentne and placetne?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

      A plural "they" verb ends in -nt; a singular "he/she/it" verb ends in -t.

      (So, placent is 3rd person plural; patellae "plates" is its subject. Patellae mihi placent , "The plates please me" = "I like the plates."

      But placet is 3rd person singular; patella "a plate" could be its subject. Patella mihi placet , "The plate pleases me" = "I like the plate.")

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