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"Sei abbastanza grande per capire."

Translation:You are old enough to understand.

June 20, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nordaker

So old can be translated to grande as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nullusaum

"You are a big boy now."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

Yes, something like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DylanSkusek

Ay yo native Italian speakers, could we have put "vecchio" instead of grande and it would still be grammatically correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/il-deca

Yes, grammatically it would be correct, but you shouldn't use it on a child.

Con il passare degli anni un uomo diventa vecchio, un bambino diventa grande.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The___Idler

DL should have given us this sentence!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pogosticksteve

When do you use "da + infinitive" versus "per + infinitive"? Is it just a matter of which infinitive verb you're using?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yulia_Shch

it's a matter of a verb that you use before an infinitive!) it can be "cominciare a capire" because cominciare requires "di", and "per capire" here because essere preceeds capire


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert600383

So in essence capire can be preceded by "a", "di" or "per". Not sure about the cominciare taking "di"' and therefore using "a", the logic seems to fail


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMacbeth

There is an explanation of when to use a preposition, and what preposition to use, here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6060401

As PemberleyOwner says, it relates to the verb used to introduce the infinitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxyzw

Quando due persone si amano molto...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bg1888

Why do you need "per" in the sentence, if "capire"means to understand?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

per adds the idea of 'for the purpose of" understanding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Also, "in order to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmidgeonOfHope

"Come on, you're big enough to figure this out. I'm nailing this broad". - George Bluth Sr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sionel

"...abbastanza grande..." is old enough?

Really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Speezz

No reason why they couldnt just use vecchia instead of grande, for the sake of being new to the language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sueheiser

Have we even seen the word "abbastanza" before yet? I don't have it in my (copious) notes, and I don't recognize it, although that doesn't necessarily mean it hasn't been broached.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pogosticksteve

Don't worry, abbastanza is a very common word, so you'll see it again. And if you are forgetting the meaning of "enough", notice the "basta" right there in the middle of the word. Basta basta basta!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonKoch-Sultan

We have. People generally take notes on nouns and verbs for vocabulary more than adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, etc., so that might be why you are missing abbastanza.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alvaro1944

To sueheiser: The Portuguese language has the word 'abastança' (in English 'abundance' or 'wealth'), which is a noun and has the same origin of the Italian "abbastanza". Greetings. November 23, 2016.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Could this be translated, youre good (aka experienced) enough to understand?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paraguaijin

i don't think so. grande means "big" (though this time it's used in the sense of "grown up"), not "good". what you're saying could be "sei abbastanza esperto per capire", can anyone else confirm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jvegacastro

In Spanish, like the Italian, it has the same meaning, that he is already a big boy, in the sense of not being a child anymore and can understand certain things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nekogaijin

In English to say "You are big enough to" may also mean - you are a good enough, secure enough person to.. as in - you are big enough to let him have all the credit. In Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewHal4550

Can I say "Sei abbastanza grande per sapire meglio" as a variation of this in Italian. "You are old enough to know better" is a pretty common expression in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/il-deca

No, "sapere meglio" is not common Italian; the sentence would be translated "sei grande abbastanza per capire meglio" or "conoscere meglio", meaning that you will fully explain him/her the argument.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elza756385

You cannot leave the verb like that in English you must use it after understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phil_steel

In the explanation of 'grande', 'grown-up' was an option but duo rejected it as part of the answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Billzorelli

wow, that's a stretch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Billzorelli

hrmm anno perche? grande = large


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

In this context it has the meaning of 'big' in the sense of "old (enough)"

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