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https://www.duolingo.com/apmaster

Gender-neutral pronouns

apmaster
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I was wondering if anyone has any knowledge of Spanish adopting its pronouns for gender neutral purposes. So far, I've only encountered El and Ella (he or she) or eso/esa/ese (that); esto/esta/este (this), but how do Spanish speakers refer to someone in general (where English speakers use "one," "their," or "they" rather than the generic he)? Am I simply to assume that Spanish had not had to deal with this issue or has not faced pressure from the Feminist and the LGBT communities?

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Possessive pronouns (my, your, his, her, our, their) take the gender and number of the item possessed, not of the owner, so that's not an issue.

Subject pronouns are always male unless the group is known to be all female, so that's not an issue, either. We is nosotros unless we are all women.

I've seen folks use @ instead of o or a when they want to include both genders. I'm trying to think of a specific example, but it would be something like l@ or ell@.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ygpdxwlr
ygpdxwlr
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I think your examples for the usage of @ are incorrect. 'abogad@' is a better one :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Yeah! That was it! It was with nouns, not pronouns. I remembered seeing it, but couldn't dredge up an example. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ygpdxwlr
ygpdxwlr
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¡De nada!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmseiple
mmseiple
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I've never seen it used as l@ or ell@ (those don't make sense to me), but I see it used a lot in the plural (even though - or because - the masculine is used for a mixed group): tod@s, vosotr@s.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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You're right. I couldn't think of an example of where I'd seen it. It was like 6mnUYnDC said, in words like maestr@. Nouns, not pronouns.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I am not sure exactly what you mean, but Spanish often uses phrases like "come se dice?" = how it is said?/how does one say? 'they" = ellos (mixed group, male and female) which should cover all the bases. 'su' = his, hers, one's, its, your, their

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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I guess you mean something like man in German. To make such an impersonal statement in Spanish you need to use a reflexive.

Aquí se come pan means Here one eats bread or Bread is eaten here (not Here bread eats itself)

Please, correct me if I'm wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ygpdxwlr
ygpdxwlr
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This is correct. Sometimes it's also necessary to use 'hay que'. For example, 'One must always do what one can.' could be translated as 'Siempre hay que hacer lo que se puede (hacer).'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/straightallies

many people use "@" in place of "a" or "o" (because it looks like an "a" inside of an "o") and it is pronounced like "ow". For instance, "Latin@" would be pronounced "la-ti-now". With pronouns, I think people opt for "su" ur "se", which is usually grammatically correct in colloquial usage anyways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph2
Joseph2
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"Sí se puede!" -- Pres. Obama's slogan in Spanish. "Yes we can!" Literally "yes one can!"

4 years ago