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  5. "E hoʻolohe pono ka pepeiao."

"E hoʻolohe pono ka pepeiao."

Translation:Listen really well.

September 23, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob746503

Rejected for writing "Listen very well." Correct answer is "Listen REALLY well. Next go-around I'll try simply "Listen well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KadookaLor

What happened to "ka pepeiao" (the ear) in the translation??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oceanic2

"Listen very good" is wrong. I don't think that's a pidgin thing, it might be an acceptable english phrase to say, "listen very good." Or maybe not, who knows?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynneo

"Listen well" is proper grammar. "Well" is being used as an adverb, describing HOW you listen. "Good" is an adjective, describing or telling "WHICH ONE" or "WHAT KIND," such as "The good boy gets the candy." Take the good pencil, not the bad one." You can't really have a "good listen," per se.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Yes, but listen very well was marked wrong! I reported it as should be correct. Am I wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDeLan394537

I believe you are right. I think it's a case of DL doesn't put every possible combination of words in the list of acceptable answers. They have to be manually entered by someone. I expect that if enough people mark it as "should be accepted", it might eventually get added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryKaHaumana

That seems like a reasonable equivalent to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puanani51

Why is ka pepeiau used in this sentence? Is it because the ears themselves do the listening and not the person ( e ho'olohe pono 'oe) ? Does this reflect a cultural difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDeLan394537

Idiom. It's not translated verbatim, but by the local understanding of the phrase. English might use "listen up" for the same thing but you aren't expected to listen to what is physically above you, just to pay attention to what's going to be said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryKaHaumana

I’m just a student also, but I suspect it’s an indirect way of saying it that fits with what I know of the aloha attitude. Saying YOU listen could be perceived as being a bit rude, so one takes the safer way and refers indirectly to the ears. Kind of like in English when the teacher says “let’s all be quiet” when they clearly intend for only the students to do so.

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