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  5. "Per silvam exire soleo."

"Per silvam exire soleo."

Translation:I usually exit through the forest.

September 24, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdmJota

Should "leave" be accepted, or would that be incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthias1414

Yes, why not. Search for "exeo", 1. singular of "exire":

https://www.online-latin-dictionary.com/latin-english-dictionary.php?parola=exeo

There you will find the translation "leave" too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beejay4

Of course it should be accepted. Leave, go out, and exit are synonymous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzXDkf

The Wolf already knows it, Red Riding Hood...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JarWarren

"I often exit through the forest" should have been accepted, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I would agree that "often" is a synonym in English of "usually"; so that, if "usually" is accepted (turning the verb, soleo, "I am accustomed" into an adverb, "usually"), then "often" ought to be accepted, too.

It may take some time for moderators to do so, if they agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It's nice that "exire" looks so much like Engl. "exit," but the translation "go out" (for exire), the literal translation, is a good one.

(Isn't "leave," "go out," etc., more in use than "to exit," which sounds very much like bureaucratese?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

That's one that doesn't seem to come from French. For a noun not in the science/art/philosophy/law world, it's strange. exit wiktionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryHrusch

With your dunk parrots and bones?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beejay4

"I usually go out through the forest" was marked wrong even though "exire" means " to go out" and "I go out" is better English than "I exit"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I agree with you.

In fact, there was a time (even before my time, though; but I've read about it) when the Latin teacher was likely to refuse to accept a translation that employed a derivative: so, he or she wouldn't want you to say "exit" when you see exīre .

In part, as you say, to avoid 'jargony' English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J_W_K20

Awful audio. "Silvam" unrecognizable. Reported.

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