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  5. "Filiae tuae in Italia habita…

"Filiae tuae in Italia habitant."

Translation:Your daughters live in Italy.

September 25, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The feminine nominative plural of the adjective tuus/tua/tuum ('your').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2243

I'm a little confused that tuae is considered nominative and not genitive. Can you help me understand what's going on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In short, Rae, a possessive is already a mark of possession in itself, so you won't add a genitive (meaning a possession).

Imagine that " 's " is the genitive, and "your" is the possessive pronoun.

If you add a genitive in the possessive pronoun, it would make something like "my's daughter is rich", or my daughter's is rich".

You do not need to add a genitive if you have the possessive pronoun.

To express possession and similar ideas the possessive pronouns are regularly used, not the genitive (...)

Domus mea
my house
[Not domus meī]

(Very rare exceptions exist to this rule, depending of the authors)

Differences between the possessive (pronouns) and the genitive (case) use, are the same than:

"my cat" and "Martin's hat."

To recognize genitive, you would have the relationship "the hat of Martin" = genitive.
Use "of" to know when you can use it.

The genitive links the name of the person/the description of the person + 's + the object owned.
It shows a relationship person/object.

The possessive addresses directly a pronoun, and show the possession for this pronoun.
The person is not named, it is replaced by a pronoun.

She has a cat: her cat.

Note: Sometimes, in this couse, we meet some special sentence structure requiring a possessive pronoun, not in the nominative, but in the dative case (=is a possession....to me, to you..),
like: nomen mihi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The genitive of the pronoun is tuī, but from what I understand, the possessive adjective is preferred when specifying possession.

While tuae could be used as the feminine genitive singular of the possessive 2nd person singular adjective, it would need to modify a noun (could be implied). It would make the most sense to then assume that it modifies filiae, but that makes an odd sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2243

How would it make an odd sentence? Sorry to keep pressing, but I'm still not grasping the distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

If we treated filiae tuae as genitive the sentence would be something like "Of your daughter, they live in Rome". Unless this is some construction that I am forgetting.

I am probably not going to be able to explain the distinction well (maybe someone else will be able to). I will give some links that may provide something that may help (whether they are the best sources is debatable).

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/possessive-pronouns

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/genitive#possessive-genitive

https://textkit.com/greek-latin-forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=63491


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2243

So essentially the entire noun phrase has to be genitive, like "The first impression I had of your daughter" but the "your" is strictly/simply a possessive adjective and the genitive is the wrong scope or something?

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