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  5. "هُنا وَهُناك"

"هُنا وَهُناك"

Translation:here and there

September 25, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Garrett694306

Am I right in saying هنا is pronounced more like 'henna' than 'hunna' in Saudi Arabia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

Proper Arabic: hu-ná

As far as I know in Saudi Arabia they say it as "hnayya" - probably western areas there that overlook Egypt across the sea do have the tendency to adapt an Egyptian dialect influence and say (hena) or (hina). In the Levant they say (hón) or (hown), and maybe (hawn) as well. Far west like in Morocco, it's probably more like "Hna"

All in all, the proper Arabic one is Huná.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oriyosef2

Shouldnt وَهُناك be pronounced as Hunaka and not hunak?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

since it comes at the end of the phrase or sentence, it's fine to drop the last vowel (typically it's dropped) since no words are coming next afterward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

The fact that there are no words coming afterwards isn't self-evidently a reason to drop the final vowel. I suppose it's related to the fact that Arabic tends to require vowels at the end of a word if the following word begins with a consonant? Arabic version of euphony. French does it differently - it doesn't mind two adjacent consonant, but tends to avoid adjacent vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

Well, in Quran for example, when one reaches the end of the verse (marked with a special sign and a number) then typically the end of the word is "stable", meaning the last vowel is not pronounced, as the sentence is complete. If the reader decides to read the last vowel in the verse then he or she MUST continue reading into the next verse.

All in all, in Arabic in general, we don't deem the last vowel necessary if the word is at the end of the sentence because the meaning is complete. Adding it and going silent do sound weird (for us). There are very specific instances where the last vowel is kept (e.g. instances of speaking to a female).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Interesting. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michaelhog139685

This is an idiomatic expression, then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

I wouldn't say idiomatic. "Here and there" is like used in most languages even in English, as in (my stuff are scattered here and there) and such. To my understanding, idioms are language/culture specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

I agree that these are not idioms. Stuff is always treated as a singular noun, so "my stuff is scattered..." even if that seems illogical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChillFrog2938

If someone asked me if I played piano, could I use this phrase to express that I dabble in it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1414

Nope, not really. This phrase is quite locative in nature.

If you mean to say (so-so) or something like that, then in standard that is typically dubbed as: بعض الشيء (ba3DHa-ššay2); Literally: a little of (this) thing. Or also نوعا ما (naw3an má); Literally: Kind of.

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