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  5. "Ego litteris studeo."

"Ego litteris studeo."

Translation:I study literature.

September 25, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael953840

Would "I myself study literature" capture the emphasis of including the pronoun "ego" when it is not necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2231

Not here. This is just to get you familiar with what the pronouns are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Disco et studeo is similiar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrG33

To my stupid Japanese ears "litteris" sounds "listeri". Hearing is awfully difficult to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jolenalatin

Why is it "litteris" and not "litteras"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The verb studeo, studere usually takes the dative instead of the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2231

"Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to", which is why it takes the dative and not the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefanMalm3

Wouldn't "I study the literature" also work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2231

I'm really not sure. In English "literature" subtly changes meaning with or without the article, so it's not simply a matter of specific vs non-specific and I don't know if the Latin word has the expanded sense that the English word can have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

the instrucciones only included nom & accus. idk when to use dative as english direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2231

Yeah, I think they included this one a little early.

"Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to", which is why it takes the dative and not the accusative.

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