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"We are now coming to the city."

Translation:Ad urbem nunc venimus.

September 26, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chr.Perrotta

Why isn't it also accepted "In urbem nunc venimus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

That would have the slightly different meaning, "We are now coming into the city" (not just "to" it).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I recommend also accepting the adverb "iam" for "now":

Iam ad urbem venimus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Gaffiot and dicolatin don't have "iam" (so maybe it's rare?), but I found it here:

https://www.online-latin-dictionary.com/latin-english-dictionary.php?parola=iam

They give: now, already, by or even now. Besides


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think iam is extremely common, and I'm guessing it's the ancestor of Spanish ya and the -jà of French déjà.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

My level in Latin doesn't allow me to know wether it's very common, but it does exist, and should be accepted.

Found many occurrences here too (so you must be right.):
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/searchresults?q=iam


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(In fact, one way that I know it's common is that the high-school Latin textbook I use includes it in the very first chapter!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelFind1

what about the compound verb advenimus? And yes, iam is absolutely common and should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, in fact the Romans like the "repetition" (as perhaps it seems to us) of preposition + verb-prefix, such that "ad urbem advenimus" is a really common thing to say, for "we arrive at the city."

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