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"Je connais ton prénom."

Translation:I know your first name.

5 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LaraMulder
LaraMulder
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is this a threat duolingo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CochiCarrie

It does sound like one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993
hmada993
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Duo est intelligent

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theneongreen

Is 'I know your forename' not acceptable here? Forename is pretty much a synonym of first name I thought.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Could be a regional thing, but duolingo should still accept it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meyralais

I put the samen and don't understand why it's not accepted as its now used on lots of uk forms etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mengjiejie

Forename is what's said in the UK instead of first name? Interesting, I haven't heard that before.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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I'm not sure what you actually put, but if you meant surname not samen ,then you should know that surname refers to the last name. Prénom is the first name.

Of course, I have no direct knowledge of U.K. forms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Typo! meyralais meant "same" not surname. He was agreeing with theneongreen. "Forename" is one of DL's correct alternatives.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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Thx. I must say that I have never heard forename used but can see that it is likely to be adopted to get away from using Christian name which is the term for first name used on forms in past generations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate_Joy

Both forename and Christian name are very much in use in the UK. The former is finally becoming more standard on official forms, after decades!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janbrickley
janbrickley
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I wish it was, marked me incorrect august 14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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I thought connais had to with knowing someone not something like a name. I guess knowing someone's name is like knowing them. I wonder if knowing other personal attributes are like knowing the person as far as the verb goes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizaisgrand

If it's the same as in Spanish (with conocer and saber), connaitre would just refer to knowing something in the sense of being familiar with it, whereas savoir would be knowing something as in knowing a fact. So here it would mean that they were familiar with that person's name.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeiDeTaiwan

Good explanation, thanks !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazaresors

In French, you cannot "savoir quelqu'un". It's "connaître quelqu'un". I know that person = Je connais cette personne (savoir is impossible here). I know his name = Je connais son nom (savoir is almost impossible here). I know how to swim = Je sais nager (connaître is impossible here).

But:

-- He's mad! -- Yes, I know.

-- Il est fou. -- Oui, je sais. (connaître is impossible here).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibuco
ibuco
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How would you say "I know his birthday/home address". I believe this would go with "savoir", and I just think knowing someone's first name falls into the same category of "knowing" :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazaresors

Je connais sa date de naissance/son adresse.

It's indeed the same "knowing" :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibuco
ibuco
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Ok, so there is difference with: "I know when the WWII started" and "I know the date the WWII started"? Sorry if I'm boring you to death, I'm just trying to find that thin line of difference, since I don't believe I've grasped the concept yet. Thanks! :)

My conclusion here is that "savoir is (also) about factual knowledge" is not entirely true, if true at all. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazaresors

"Je sais quand la seconde guerre mondiale a commencé." vs. "Je connais la date à laquelle la seconde guerre mondiale a commencé."

When what you know is a subordinate clause you cannot use "connaître".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shakir.mol

sounds like some cheesy dialogue for a villian

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DozyRosy

It gives "christian name" as an alternative, but did not accept my answer when I spelt it with a capital "C", which is how it should be written.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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I'm sure many Christians feel Christ in any form should always be capitalized but I think the rule is that generally capitals apply to so called proper nouns and their derivative forms. The term Christian name has now expanded from being the name given during baptism to being the legally specified first name/s. As such, many people classify Christian, as it is used in the contemporary fashion of naming, as a common noun/derivative.

Of course, when you are not submitting answers for examination as to whether proper rules have been followed, I don't think anyone would criticize capitalizing Christian even when it is used as an adjective in a now completely secular practice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DozyRosy

So Duo are saying my answer was wrong because I spelt it with a Capital letter?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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No. You indicated that the reason your answer was marked wrong is because you used a capital C in Christian.

I was just pointing out that the secular take on Christian name would be that it should be treated as a common noun. I'm not sure what Duo thinks about capitalizing adjectives and nouns that are sometimes common and sometimes proper. I know they are pretty indifferent to punctuation in general.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DozyRosy

Okay, so why was it marked wrong if not because spelt with a capital letter? "christian name" was given as one of the meanings.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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Not sure. It's a good idea to copy and paste error responses if you can.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

check again because duo does not count capitals or accents wrong tho it might correct things in green...spelling tho gets dinged...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sallyjames

I am sure I had the same sentence but with savoir. Can either be used in this context?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazaresors

"Je sais ton prénom" is grammatically correct, it means something, but you will never heard it, and you will hardly see it written.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrasshopperPie

I'm quite sure you can also say "Je sais son nom" meaning I'm aware of it or have it in my memory. Here's a song called "Je ne sais pas son nom" http://66.46.185.79/BDL/gabarit_bdl.asp?t1=1&id=2416 I find this is unfortunately not the greatest example for learning the verb "connaître" since in most other cases connaître cannot be replaced by "savoir". This page gives a helpful comparison of the two verbs: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=25697&langid=3 And this, though completely in French is also very good: http://66.46.185.79/BDL/gabarit_bdl.asp?t1=1&id=2416

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrasshopperPie

Sorry, I pasted the wrong link for the song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vT951hSggVY

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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I suspect so, savoir would give the 'I know your name' connaitre 'I am familiar with your name'. Best guess.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woodswake

Duo has used both "Je connais" and "Je sais" for prénom in this lesson. Which is correct, or are both? I would think it was "sais" because it is a piece of knowledge, but maybe I'm wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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I think it's an edge case. If you use connais then you're indicating you are familiar with that name (and possibly person). If you use sais then it's more factual, you know of that particular name (and possibly its background and meaning)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/to-mor
to-mor
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Christian name should be accepted. It may not be PC but it is in general use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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Nothing un-PC about it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Big deal, I ain’t exactly Rumpelstiltskin.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RBell-63
RBell-63
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"forename" is given as one of three acceptable translations if one hovers over the word"prenom".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaValerie

I am already frustrated with this section! 'prénom' is translated as first name or forename, but I can use forename even two questions ago it was fine?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Given all this discussion, I'd be interested to hear from anyone who uses "forename" in ordinary conversation, because it's not something I've ever heard used, either in the western US where I grew up, or in western Canada where I live now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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We use forename all the time here in the uk.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

"Forename" is common in written form; "first name" is the norm in spoken (British) English.

Sadly, the traditional "Christian name" is now considered politically incorrect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bageder
Bageder
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Your first comment seems correct, but whatever a person's religion, it shouldn't be assumed he or she is named in any particular one.

Is "Muhammad" a Christian name? It could be, I suppose, but there aren't many people christened Muhammad! And I could well understand if Muhammad resented having to fill in forms that ask for a Christian name. (I would resent it, too. I was born to a nominally Christian family, but I was never christened. Amusingly, perhaps, my would-be godfather died the day before I was due to be christened. Some said it was fate. :) )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

I suppose it depends on attitude. (I think we agree "Christian name" no longer has anything but a nominal connection with Christianity.) If I lived in an country whose laws and culture came from Islam, which described my prénom as "Islamic name", I don't think I'd take offence however devout a Christian I was. (Sorry if the analogy doesn't work.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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It's the church that has told officials that they're not allowed to use Christian name for first name anymore. It's nothing to do with causing offence to Muslims, Hindus, etc...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bageder
Bageder
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I think if I were in a country with a radically different ethos from what I'm used to, I would acquiesce to any religious and political demands placed upon me. I'm a coward like that. I would be very reluctant to complain, but I admire those who do! :)

[Edit - as I don't seem to have a reply option under your message below.]

StevieCham1,

We have strayed away from language. I'll try to contact you through the messaging system.

[Another edit: there used to be a way to send messages to other users, but that function was removed from DuoLingo some time ago. Sorry if I misled anyone.]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

where is the messaging system?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

Bageder, what you call cowardice I think of as courtesy!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I_Am_Robin
I_Am_Robin
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Any less religious English speaking country uses prename or forename instead of christian name.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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I've never heard of 'prename', personal name or first name yes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bageder
Bageder
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Nor have I. (I'm British.)

I_Am_Robin, may I ask, which "less religious English-speaking countries" do you have in mind? And "less religious" than which countries?

Regards

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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Never heard prename - prenom in french only

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

lucky you

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
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Where I come from it is either "first name" or "given name". I've never heard anyone use "forename" but they may use that in places I have not been.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally.C

I checked the translation provided by Duolingo and read first name and christian name. In English, it is preferable to say " Christian name." However, this was not accepted by Duo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janbrickley
janbrickley
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In our multicultural and mainly secular/agnostic society it's not generally considered to be politically correct to use the term Christian name, I think; at least not in the UK amongst the folk I know!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
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It is true that not everyone is baptised , which is where "Christian name" comes from. A large proportion of persons in the United States belong to some other religion or are secular.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StripeySquirrel

Prenom spoken by duolingo sounds more like prenez

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macqusie

I put Christian name and it marked me wrong!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vale3040

Oh my, is duolingo threatining us? I KNOW YOUR FIRST NAME!!! The threats are real lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turcois

What exactly is a Christian name?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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It is the designation for the first name in English. This is an artifact of the Christian roots of the English language. The first name of a baby was recorded in church records at the time of baptism. Baptism was a ritual of the Christian church that involved elaborate spiritual and social significance. Thus the name recorded during baptism shortly after birth came to be known as the Christian name.

Most English speaking societies currently promote some degree of multiculturalism thus the use of the term Christian name is no longer universal and is rapidly becoming unfashionable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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I think it's also to do with men of the cloth telling people that unless they've been baptised then they don't have a name, as has happened a lot in the UK.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistymorisson

What's the difference of savoir and connaitre? arent they both to know? im confused help

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

Hmm. It seems "Christian name" is not acceptable. I wonder why.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bageder
Bageder
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Are you being ironic? Presumably, only Christians have Christian names.

On second thoughts, perhaps it's not that straightforward.
Just suppose... I was born into a Christian family, so I was give a Christian name. However, I was never Christened, so was it really a Christian name? I am no longer believer, but I still have the forename I was given at birth. Is it a Christian name? I really don't know.

Regards

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevieCham1

It's a long time since the term "Christian name" had anything to do with Christianity. I just think it's bizarre that the term has become so toxic that people have to find an alternative. Political correctness, I suppose.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bageder
Bageder
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I don't agree with you, StevieCham1, but let's not have an argument about it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebHu

so whats my last name?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magentafrost56

Don't give that info out.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boydus01
Boydus01
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Surname

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TashaDax

What is the difference between "nom" and "prénom"? I mean, I'm fairly sure that when you ask somebody's name, you ask for "nom". I could be entirely wrong though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I_Am_Robin
I_Am_Robin
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"I know your prename" isn't accepted 07-APR-17

Prename, noun: A first name, forename

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Illutale

When would you use this phrase?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DackabyShark

I know right :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XaNdIINhOwWWW

Heisenberg

2 weeks ago