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"Noli appropinquare psittaco irato."

Translation:Don't approach an angry parrot.

September 29, 2019

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

And hurl spears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/voidIndigo

My thought exactly!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkK140481

He might not have got his drink on, hence the anger


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egcw1995

Excellent advice. Similar in fact to my favorite latin sentence.

Draco dormiens nunquam titulandus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Acorn_Fur

Never Tickle A Sleeping Dragon - Hogwarts Motto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What is the meaning? I tried to translate, but I've found "titulandus" as something entitled?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think it's usually given as "titillandus." "A sleeping dragon must never be tickled."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Isn't it "titillandus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The OLD has a titillare, with double l, for "to tickle, to stimulate sensually, to arouse." (It's a real Latin word, but the 'motto' Draco dormiens numquam titillandus (if that's the right word order) is from Harry Potter, so ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Right, edited. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liz910042

They may start hurling spears...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nKur5ZgK

It's very good advice, though: Don't approach ANYTHING that's angry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilvanaR642668

Shouldn't it be "Noli appropinquare psittacum iratum," because it's an accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

appropinquō, appropinquāre takes the dative instead of the accusative like studeō, studēre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetroWestJP

Thank you! This was what I came here to ask. (Couldn't figure out if it was dative or ablative since they're identical in this case.) Too bad this helpful information is buried under all the comments about drunk parrots and tickling dragons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You can also construct the verb with an ad + accusative prepositional phrase:

Noli ad psittacum iratum appropinquare!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hobbit22.9

Beware Psittacosis! No, seriously:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PenguinLover1001

Probably drunk and deceitful and hurl spears


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimatter162

THE RETURN OF THE PARROT!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bufobufobufo34

I love the articulation...delightful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drskaiser

"Don't go near the angry parrot" was not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiyaMary2009

Noli appropinquare psittaco irato means dont approach an angry parrot.. Thats it.. Its quite simple, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeinrichIV

How to know which case is called for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

A Latin dictionary will tell you.

My first-year Latin students (in high school) learn these five, that "take the dative" for no obvious reason (to non-Latin speakers, that is):

appropinquāre , to approach, come near to; favēre , to root for, support; cōnfīdere , to have faith in, trust; nocēre , to do harm to, hurt; occurrere , to run into, encounter.

My 2nd-year students add: pārēre , to obey; parcere , to spare, be merciful to; crēdere , to trust.

(Of course, any verb that means "give, show, tell" is likely to have both a direct object in the accusative case, and an indirect object in the dative case: such as dēmōnstrāre or ostendere for to show a direct object to an indirect object; dare and trādere to give or hand over (a DO to an IO); nārrāre for to tell something (DO) to someone (IO).)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

In German, we also have Nähere dich keinem zornigen Papagei! with the dative case. (Perhaps that may be useful as a memory aid.)

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