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"Noli appropinquare psittaco irato."

Translation:Don't approach an angry parrot.

September 29, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/voidIndigo

My thought exactly!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

And hurl spears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egcw1995

Excellent advice. Similar in fact to my favorite latin sentence.

Draco dormiens nunquam titulandus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What is the meaning? I tried to translate, but I've found "titulandus" as something entitled?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think it's usually given as "titillandus." "A sleeping dragon must never be tickled."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Isn't it "titillandus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The OLD has a titillare, with double l, for "to tickle, to stimulate sensually, to arouse." (It's a real Latin word, but the 'motto' Draco dormiens numquam titillandus (if that's the right word order) is from Harry Potter, so ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Right, edited. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liz910042

They may start hurling spears...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nKur5ZgK

It's very good advice, though: Don't approach ANYTHING that's angry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilvanaR642668

Shouldn't it be "Noli appropinquare psittacum iratum," because it's an accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

appropinquō, appropinquāre takes the dative instead of the accusative like studeō, studēre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You can also construct the verb with an ad + accusative prepositional phrase:

Noli ad psittacum iratum appropinquare!

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