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  5. "You read the book."

"You read the book."

Translation:Tu librum legis.

September 29, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arthur7.7.7.

legere

legō, legere, lēgī, lēctum (3.)

In English: to read, to gather, to collect In German: lesen, auslesen, sammeln, mustern, durchfahren In French: ramasser, recueillir, lire, parcourir

ACTIVE

Indicative present

legō

legis

legit

legimus

legitis

legunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prot194793

Huge thanks, especially the conjugations at the bottom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inermat

When do I use libros and librum?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Both are accusative (the direct object, for most verbs), libros is plural, librum is singular.

(Tu) librum legis -> You read the book.

(Tu) libros legis -> You read the books.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NishthaM2004

In one of the previous questions (choose the correct one type) the sentence given was "Tu librum legit"...however as u can see here that isn't the case. I'd be very thankful if someone could explain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

legit would be incorrect as it has a third person singular ending which doesn't reflect the tu (though it may get accepted as a 'typo' currently).

(tu) librum legis -> you (singular) read the book.

librum legit -> he/she/it reads the book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaeci11

I'm VERY confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

The proper Latin sentence for "you read the book" is "tu librum legis". You need a second person singular verb to go with tu; 2nd singular always ends with "s" in the present. You could also use the plural you (you all read the book), which would be "Vos librum legitis". This uses second person plural forms. The 2nd plural ending is always "tis" in the present. Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anastasia_Wolfe

I don't think you need the "tu" or the "vos" as their meaning is already included in the endings of "legis" and "legitis"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReganCuthb

I got this as well and was quite confused..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

Isn't librum for a book and liber for the book?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

No, the difference between liber and librum is the grammatical case (it's meaning/use in a sentence). It does not determine if the article in the English translation is 'a/an' or 'the'.

It is librum (accusative) here since the action of reading is being done to the book. If the book was reading (nominative), then liber would be used.

liber legit -> the book reads

librum legit -> he/she/it reads the/a book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eli58607

Liber means book...too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes, liber means book and librum is a form of it. Latin has a grammatical case system with nouns meaning that it changes form based on its use in the sentence.

It is librum (accusative, the direct object case) here since the action of reading is being done to the book. If the book was reading (nominative, the subject case), then liber would be used.

liber legit -> the book reads

librum legit -> he/she/it reads the/a book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shelby203048

I did exactly what it told me to and it said I did it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NateDog6174

I wrote “Legis librem” I figured you know who is doing the reading (you) by the -is at the end of “legis”. It follows 3rd Conj. And “Liber” is book, correct? So wouldn’t the correct way to write that in the accusative singular be “librem”? Like “mater” is “matrem”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

No, liber is a second declension noun, so the accusative singular is librum. There are a few second declensions that end in -r

Mater is a third declension noun and declines differently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NateDog6174

So basically I have to memorize each and every word’s declension.

Also thanks moopish. You’ve helped me a ton already. Do you have an email I could ask questions at when I have them? Am I allowed to ask that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It becomes easier with time.

Glad I could be some help. Just leave questions in the sentence discussions and if me or someone else knows the answer, you should get it fairly quickly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snottran

Why not "librum legis"? Is YOU really necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Tu is not necessary. Report it should it happen to not accept 'librum legis' again.

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