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"The soldiers destroy the bridge by fire."

Translation:Milites pontem igne delent.

September 30, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

"Igne" is the ablative of "ignis"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Whit the fire/By the fire (With the help of, by the means of...)

"Ablative of means" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnison06

What is the preferred/most common word order here? Should igne appear before the verb, emphasizing their connection, or before the object, emphasizing their connection? I would tend towards the former, which is also suggested by Duo, but I'd like additional information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

According to this page, the ablative of means seems to have a relatively free word order:

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/ablative-means


Pattern 1

Omnibus precibus ōrābant -> Abl, verb

Cum complētus mercātōrum carcer esset -> Abl, Subj, verb

Multae istārum arborum meā manū sunt satae. -> (Subj), Abl, Verb, Compl

Omnia plēna lūctūs et maerōris fuērunt -> Subj, Abl, Verb


Pattern 2:

Potius oppressa virtūte audācia est -> Compl, Abl, (Subj), Verb

Tōtum montem hominibus complēvit. -> Compl, Abl, Verb

ōllam dēnāriōrum implēre -> Compl, Abl, Verb


Pattern 3:

Vīta plēna et cōnferta voluptātibus -> Subj, Abl


So, it seems to depend on the emphasis, as the complement of means is particularly prone to be emphasized or not.

In their page, I noticed "ablative of means" in the first place = seems to be the emphasized version,
and "ablative of means" in the middle, sometimes after the complement.

Most of the time it is just before the verb. = I think it's the most common pattern.
(Sometimes the subject comes between the ablative of means and the verb)

The Duo sentence is Milites pontem igne delent -> Subj, Compl, Abl, Verb

According to these examples, the most common order would probably be:
Compl Abl Sub Verb, or Subj, Abl, Verb, Compl.

-Pontem igne milites delent.
- Or Milites igne delent pontem.

The duo's sentence seems to emphasize rather the subject, here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ecominetti

And so the Bridgeburners are born


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vq4ESWi3

I wrote "Milites pontem delent igne". It is good too, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Just report it, I think it's equally correct, and that they will add it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HalynaBowl

It's very vague as to what word for fire should be used. Did they burn it be use of a pyre? What about by flame? They should be more spcific as to which word for fire should be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardWisn

I gave the answer "milites delent pontem igne" which is equally valid given it contains the same exact ingredients.

I understand it wasn't in the traditional SOV word order but it is still a grammatically correct sentence no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Just report it, it should be added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark841597

Having sung the sentence "dum veneris judicare seculum per ignem" several times in my life, I wondered if 'per ignem' would work in this sentence too. Or is that strictly ecclesiastical Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefaniHa

In early lessons we're told that word order makes little difference because all words in Latin are cased to show their use. Yet now Duo requires a specific word order? Which is it? No order or a specific one?

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