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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbsrule

Māori coming to the incubator soon

In case you missed the announcement made at Duocon, which you can see here:
https://www.twitch.tv/videos/484352859?t=07h52m

This is great news!


Manĝu terpomojn kaj feliĉiĝu!

October 1, 2019

135 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

Kia ora. I got interested in Maori after watching "Hunt for the Wilderpeople" where the guy from Jurassic Park, Sam Neill, got to speak in his native NZ English dialect. One scene stumped me where a character says to the kid, "Stay moldy, bro" They were Maori. Then I watched a lot of Hakas on youtube and would like to know what they say.

And the director/actor/Maori of the movie, Taika Waititi, impressed me so much I watched one of his other works that has even a stronger Maori theme, "Boy". Both movies fun to watch with a lot of word play.

Movies can inspire learning a language. Also music. The Hu Band from Mongolia is doing a world tour and I need to learn that language, too. I've used up most of my lives but I have a couple left, so who knows?

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinCurran

I think the "stay moldy, bro" is actually "stay Māori, bro." It's been a while since I've seen the movie, but just saying "moldy" in my head sounds like how people here often say "Māori". NZ accents are a real mishmash and range of regions and ethnicities. :-)

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoges.110

I think with the Hakas they're yelling, "Kill! Kill! Kill!" But I won't know until I start learning Maori of course.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larkspire

The most widely known haka, Ka Mate, translates as:

'Tis death! 'tis death! (or: I may die) ’Tis life! ‘tis life! (or: I may live)

’Tis death! ‘tis death! ’Tis life! ‘tis life!

This is the hairy man

Who summons the sun and makes it shine

A step upward, another step upward!

A step upward, another... the Sun shines!

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

A bit more context from Wikipedia:

Te Rauparaha composed "Ka Mate" circa 1820 as a celebration of life over death after his lucky escape from pursuing Ngāti Maniapoto and Waikato [i.e. tribal] enemies. He had hidden from them in a pātaka, a food-storage pit, and climbed back into the light to be met by a chief friendly to him – Te Whareangi (the "hairy man").

Te Rauparaha is a pretty influential figure in New Zealand's history. A few years ago, I went to the place where his placenta is buried. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Rauparaha

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonlander89

Kia ora from New Zealand. Am super excited for Māori. Kia kaha te reo!

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaJung14

As a New Zealander, I'm excited for this course! We were not taught much Maori in school, just the very basics in primary. Yayy! :-)

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Judging from the Hawaiian and Navajo courses - don't get your hopes up. This won't be another French or German course but something much, much smaller.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2Milena

Actually, Hawaiian improved a lot. They add new skills and audio and they will continue doing that in the future. At the moment the biggest problem is that there isn't a lot of tips for the course.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Well, people can start it and complete it, brush up on it every once in awhile, and eventually they might build on the tree, adding skills.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

I too am hoping Navajo gets audio (an absolute must), and also becomes extensive. It's more important with little languages like these that Duolingo provides materials. With Spanish or French or German or whatever, it's easy to find free resources. There's no free FSI Navajo or Maori, that's for certain!

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

Has NZ press indicated if Maori is at risk of extinction? It sounds at risk to me, from the numbers reported in Wikipedia, but Wikipedia isn't known for accuracy.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

No risk of extinction - exactly. It has suffered the fate of many small languages however. It has not only absorbed a lot of English words (abet slightly modified) but the grammar has been more closely aligned with English as well. Sadder is the loss of many dialects.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonicarty

It's in a renaissance at the moment where tertiary education is unable to accept all students applications due to the high volume and Māori language books are the top sellers nationwide. Alongside this, the government is looking into policies to ensure it's entrenched in school education.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KonaFlanag

Maori is an awesome language where you can travel back in time and speak it. If you check out the dance and singing, you will maybe be able to know the words! Maori is a great language for Duolingo

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

you can travel back in time and speak it

Actually it is spoken today (although heavily modified). It is one of NZ's official languages and can be used in court and at Parliament and is regularly heard on radio and TV.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langophobe

Are there any people left who actually speak it better than English? How common is it to find people who speak it as a primary language at home? I highly admire NZ's commitment to the language and people by teaching it in school. I wish the US would offer the local native american languages in schools. (They might in the south west though, large native american population there).

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

About 21% of the Maori population speak it (but less than 4% of the total population). The percentages have actually been dropping over the last 20 years despite the languages nests. The highest proportion is in the over 80s Maori (about 45%). Assuming this group would be similar to my uncle, I assume they would have had it as their first language and only picked up English when they went to school. Today you can do your schooling in Maori but unless you stay in isolated communities you do still have to learn English.

How well do that 21% speak it? At least for every day use - but that can be quite a low level and possibly people over estimate their ability. But I have met people who are fully fluent in a wide range of situations.

Wrt learning it at school, not only are full immersion language nests available - from kindergarten to high schhol, but any teacher who has qualified since the 1980s has to pass a certain level of Maori to qualify - no matter what their teaching subjects are. This may sound great but it can lead to baby beginners teaching the language to the kids.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

Better - very few, if any. English is absolutely required in NZ society, so even if you learned Maori as a primary language, your English would (need to) be just as good.

Primary language at home - not an inconsiderable amount, but it's unusual. A few times I've heard parents in stores in both urban and rural areas use it to bark commands at their children; things like "come here" and "listen to me". There are some "Maori immersion" schools where all subjects are taught in Maori. I'd expect most families with kids at those schools also speak it at home, or would like to.

The primary national radio station has their presenters uniformly introduce and sign-off in Maori. That used to be English-only, then maybe 50:50 with English, and now I've only heard it in Maori for several years. Most schools teach it (though getting teachers is hard). It was compulsory for me at Catholic school 1995-2003 (i.e. for my first 8 years of school). These are deliberate attempts at revitalising the language, but there has never been a period in NZ's rather brief (post-)colonial history when Maori was not spoken at all, unlike some more endangered languages. A key difference from the USA is that Maori as an ethnic group make up >10% of the population, whereas I understand that Native Americans are <1% nationally.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langophobe

Interesting, just looked it up. Alaska has the highest percentage at 13.7%, but Oklahoma has the highest number, almost 280,000! And Los Angeles county alone has 233,000! Compare with 600,000 Maori, that would be like the top 5 states in NA population.

Issue with native american languages is that there's so many, there's no one group with as many as Maori. Biggest are Navajo and Cherokee with ~300,000 apiece.

Edit: the first 4 states by NA population break 600,000

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John892741

Māori language crêches and Māori medium schools all are increasing the number of language speakers. But yeah, everyone also speaks English. Not a bad thing. But anyone who's grown up attached to their marae would encounter the language there quite a bit. As a migrant to NZ it's much harder to source good andragogical self-directed learning materials for the language. 20 years ago I tried the same thing with Irish and struggled to find good resources--there are many more resources now.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 107

Both Irish and Welsh are on Duolingo and all speakers (at least those old enough to be in school) are also fluent in English.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goodtimes_Gordon

Irish and Welsh have rich and ancient written histories however.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John892741

No they don't. They have limited written histories. 99.9999% of people were illiterate until the 19th century. ALL languages exist primariliy as spoken languages.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goodtimes_Gordon

I've read that the most fluent speakers of Maori today are practically all white academics or activists, ironically.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Wouldn't surprise me. My uncle who spoke from birth and grew up in mostly Maori area, left as soon as he could and switched to English. He ensured his children were English speakers. And once said that Maori was only for [impolite word] .

Yet there are others to whom their roots are important and have studied the language to a serious degree.

But, yes, speaking Maori is often virtue signalling.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hiro_04

Is this the part of the problem? Is Maori culture not as intrinsically linked to the modern NZ identity? Many countries around the world have a national language/English diglossia with both being actively promoted by the government. So languages that are getting smaller due to English shouldn't be since coexistence is possible .

October 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonbriden

Where did you read that? Doesn't match my experience of living in NZ. Most academics I know who speak fluently are Maori. I know a few activists who speak it well, but they are not fluent. There are plenty of Maori who speak it as their primary language at home and socially. Perhaps you are confusing fluency (able to express oneself easily and articulately) with technical accuracy? As a comparison, I've observed plenty of native Spanish speakers making grammatical and spelling errors that I would not make, but that does not mean I am more fluent in Spanish (far from it).

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John892741

Agreed. And there's more language learning of Māori in the polytech sector than in the universities.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John892741

Nnnnope.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeneralDis1

If there's no webcam based Haka dance testing, I will forever disown Duo.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

"haka" is not really a dance and if DL was to use haka on the site they could expect a intellectual property challenge. Seriously, they are copyright and are considered taonga (treasure).

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeneralDis1

Joking. I'm not actually expecting duo to have webcam based haka testing.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

This has come up again this year (within the last month or so). Not sure if the case has gone through - but it is definitely being pushed again.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kat584931

Of course its not copyrighted, it was written before NZ even existed as a country.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Je-suis-personne

This is great news! I'm a New Zealander, and the next language on my list to learn is Māori. I was hoping to see the language come to the site eventually.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

But Maori classes are free in NZ for NZers. And you get a live teacher (and maybe some kapa haka :-) ) No offence, Duo, but a better option.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Je-suis-personne

I completely agree, but it's good to have multiple different learning tools for a language. Plus, Duolingo can bring the language to the rest of the world and make it more well known and studied.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinMcKin7

Agreed. However not everyone in New Zealand can get to 'live' classes. Secondly, having 'done' both Esperanto and Welsh with Duolingo, and French for several years at school and university - and studied linguistics too - I think I know a bit about language learning. I can vouch for Duolingo's teaching method. It is much better than (say) Toko Reo, an online Māori language course, which I gave up after a few weeks. I can't wait for a Duolingo Māori course.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cath529385

I'll have to say that I am finding the Duolingo French course great, and much better than any other French course I've studied, either online or face to face...

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinCurran

They're not quite as accessible as all that, are they? I know that they're offered in a lot of community ed programs, but that's at a (low) cost and only certain locations. Not sure where all the free classes are - but just because I don't know of them doesn't mean they don't exist. :-)

Duo would be great because the learning can be done in your own time and location (living in Auckland, that's a huge consideration). Of course it would be best to partner Duo with live classes with fluent speakers, but not everyone can access that, even in NZ.

Teaching Maori still isn't totally mainstream. My NZ born and educated kids know fewer Maori words than I, an immigrant, do. Probably there's some fault on their sides, but the schools were pretty low key about incorporating Maori. It's there, but certainly not required. I believe that this is changing for primary school, which is good.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Last year I investigated community classes for a friend in Christchurch. There was quite a choice of classes - and all were free for NZ citizens.

Speaking the language and the cultural aspects are also important - you won't get that with DL.

If schools add Maori they need good teachers - ones who are beyond beginner and can speak fluently. You need courses that go beyond greetings, colours, and days of the week. And you also have to ask what are you willing to drop to fit the course in?

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John892741

Here in Auckland, lots of long waitlists.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonbriden

I've done some of those classes, and I can't wait for DL to have Maori! The classes are fine, but I found the pace of learning to be too slow for my liking. It also limits when you can learn to a very specific time, whereas with DL I can be learning wherever and whenever I like. I'm planning on using DL to help quickly build my vocabulary and some basic grammar, and then hope to try a slightly higher level of live class.

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siorcoch

I agree with this completely! I dropped out of my te reo class at AUT because the pace was just too slow. I also felt like we were learning set phrases as opposed to learning the tools to express ourselves. It just wasn't engaging. Final straw for me was when my kaiako told me I needed to "create my own language community" when I asked if there were any clubs or places I could practice speaking. Resorted to self guided study and still going strong - books, Māori TV, online groups, online resources, etc. and I'm probably at a better level now than any of my old classmates (if they even stuck with it).

October 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

It's very funny that courses like that (non work-related courses) are exclusive to citizens, when it would be a clever way to draw tourists, who would stay a while and buy lots of stuff.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Oh, they ca do the courses - but they have to pay.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielVanD18

Wow! The languages get more different every time, instead of common ones, but that is awesome. I just wonder why other, more common languages aren’t added, instead of tiny-tree small languages, like Navajo. It would be such a nice and interesting language to learn.

An Indigenous Australian language is probably way in the future, but I think quite a few Australians, and others would learn it. I definitely would.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanase4367

I just wish Canada, Australia, and the US would promote more indigenous culture and make it mainstream like what New Zealand is doing. NZ promotes Maori culture and language and make the Haka part of mainstream New Zealand culture. It shows that they respect and recognize the indigenous peoples and don't try to isolate them.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goodtimes_Gordon

Australia doesn't have a single dominant indigenous language (practically all of them endangered or moribund, with no written texts except linguistic papers), or ethnicity. NZ just has Maori, who are also a far larger % of the population than Australian aborigines.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielVanD18

I think it is getting better though, like more Indigenous Australian speeches at events etc.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuoDinga

I absolutely understand your fundamental message-- the idea that Indigenous cultures should be celebrated as every bit as vibrant, valid, and meaningful as the dominant ones. 

However, I think there is the tendency for Settler populations in these colonial countries to try and dictate this process of bringing elements of Indigenous cultures (languages, clothing, aesthetics, etc.) into the mainstream, and this can be problematic.  Culture exists in a context (epistemology, common history, etc), and it can be understandably contentious for a society that worked for generations to assimilate and destroy Indigenous cultures and nationhoood to turn around and try and turn what remains into some kind of common property/heritage. There really is the profound need to honour Indigenous leadership and preferences in this evolution-- the colonial state and society have to to walk with humility in reconciliation. 

October 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ccf-Uk_2018

I think it's finding people to contribute to making the course. I was at DuoCon and one of the staff members (I think Hope Wilson or Myra) told me the Navajo course was created by working with one of the leaders of teaching Navajo. I'm looking forward to seeing what other language course become available. I remember them saying Basque was a possibility as well. It's just finding the right people to create the courses :-)

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2Milena

Basque would be amazing. Probably from Spanish.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielVanD18

What about English? :)

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blurflux

Yeah courses from Spanish are a big no if you're a Portuguese speaker. It just becomes frustrating to be penalized for portuñol. :/

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

Whoohoo! That's great news, I'd definitely be interested in learning it (especially once I get a bit more of a hang of the languages I recently added).

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiwi548701

i cannot wait

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tracy382545

I became interested in learning Maori when I heard Hayley Westenra sing "Pokarekare Ana" I LOVE the song and the way she sings it! I LOVE her voice!! I've just gone back to learning how to sing in this classical form and I want to be able to one day sing in the languages that I want to learn. I found one woman ( which HIGHLY INSPIRES me) she is singing in Ancient dialects and is touring. I have to get her name and post. I'm wanting to learn not only Ancient Egyptian but Ancient Babylonian and she writes her own music in these ancient dialects. I hope one day I can see her AND Hayley perform! :) I'm SOO GLAD Maori is coming to Duo, I'm doing it on Memrise ( just started). :) Can't wait!

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daKanga
Mod
  • 250

I still have not noticed any official written notice from Duolingo. (Though that may have been as I have not yet come across it.) And I am mentioning this as a volunteer, who has a slight habit of also keeping their ear to the ground. (transcript of the above I am about to print.)

However there is this post that may also interest people:

https://tewahanui.nz/culture/te-reo-maori-is-likely-to-be-added-to-a-popular-language-learning-app
Published May 15, 2019.

Though note : this is not from a Duolingo source.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daKanga
Mod
  • 250

Link to Transcript of this notice: click here

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kilobort

Wonderful to see new even more new languages being added. I wonder if Tsalagi will ever be added...

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

Cherokee would indeed be nice.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanase4367

It's good that Maori is coming to Duolingo and would boost more users in New Zealand, but I would to see Duolingo add more of the major and minor Asian, Eastern European, and African languages that are currently missing.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyqtor
  • 1746

Don't get me wrong, I'm happy for Maori, but... it's just that I'm not sure I'll ever get to use it, because I live in Europe and flights to New Zealand are slightly beyond my reach at the moment, financially speaking. I do know someone who has been to New Zealand and I know it's truly a fascinating place, its English name doesn't do it justice. But its Maori name does: Aotearoa - the land beyond the white cloud! Among its wonders, I know of Piopiotahi - named after the now-extinct Piopio bird (better known as Milford Sound), lake Wakatipu, Rotorua and many other places that were named by the Maori.

But for the moment, I would prefer more languages that are a bit closer to home, many of them highly requested, and which I could use in the near future, such as: Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Slovak, Slovenian, Georgian, Armenian, Persian. Also, some other Turkic languages such as Kazakh would come in handy, as well as Thai and Khmer from Southeast Asia.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Actually, even if you came to NZ you would be pushed to find someone to converse with (it is spoken to some degree by only about 3% of the general population).

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blurflux

Yeah I really think Bulgarian would be the most useful Slavic language to start with, considering my brain refuses to understand the logic of cases even in Latin (which is otherwise easy-peasy to me - I am native to Portuguese, conversational in Spanish, and understand everything that is not-Basque in Iberia, Occitan and French when written or with subtitles, and Italian when spoken very, very, very slowly) and Duolingo probably will never have an Interslavic course, so the one closest to Old Church Slavonic probably is a safe bet.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ccf-Uk_2018

Looking forward to it! Maybe one day we'll get a Samoan course too :-) They have it available on an app called Drops, as well as Icelandic, so maybe we could see both one day in the next 1-3 years :-) I wonder what other languages we'll be able to learn? I heard them mention Basque was a possibility, but I hope Persian, Thai, and Serbo-Croatian get added one day. And more sub-saharan languages like Hausa, Xhosa, and Shona please, if it's possible! :-)

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

Drops is way overpriced.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel768343

Wow

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goodtimes_Gordon

Yiddish, Gaelic, Maori, Haitian Creole... people have been waiting on Persian for years, with many volunteers, but it still isn't in the incubator. Why?

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReidHT

Although I'm certainly happy that smaller languages are being added, I definitely agree with you. Large languages with dozens of volunteers like Persian, Thai and Serbo Croatian that have been begged for YEARS still haven't been added. I wish Duolingo would clarify their decision process because I don't understand their rationale at all.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

I'm sure the decision process is complex and constantly changing. I'm also sure they would love to add all the languages immediately if that were possible. They have limited resources and are trying to add languages as quickly as they can. Please be patient. They want to add your favorite language, too, and they will eventually get to it.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

I have been explaining that for ages about the limited resources, but for some reason people just don't seen to get it. It's like they have never had to live on a budget and manage their own resources so they don't realize that everyone, even a successful business, has limits on how much they can do at a given period of time.

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Maybe it is the young age of many of the people on site - or maybe the site attracts people who like a free app because they have no resources themselves.

October 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Is it politics or something? Because it's not the lack of contributors. Some languages had dozens of volunteers, but Duo didn't reply to any of them.

For endangered languages, UNESCO or some NGO could help.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Could be a number of reasons - the technical challenges of the script maybe one. Also availability of existing simple courses for English speakers that will slot into the DL framework (Maori is taught in nearly every school in NZ plus kindergartens and community courses - there are heaps of resources to tap into easily). It is even possible they are getting help from one of the many official organizations that teach Maori. And we won't mention the politics involved for an American company teaching Farsi. Might they lose funding?

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langophobe

Why would they lose funding? So many people in America are valued because they learn middle eastern languages. In fact, I was just speaking with a woman tonight who is in the military and learned farsi because the military needed her to. As in, she went to the DLI (military equivalent of the FSI) where the government paid for her to learn it. Similarly, I've previously known people who went there and learned Hebrew and Arabic on the government's dime.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoges.110

Oh my God! Someone pay me to learn something pleeeeze!!

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbsrule

I would quit my job tomorrow if I could get paid to learn languages. (Although not if it involved joining the army).

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langophobe

NSA is big on linguists. So is state department.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

Many years ago, I tried to join army to get it over with and got medical rejection. A few years later they changed their mind and grabbed me. Sent me to a far away country to "help" the people and did not teach me a single word. I was sent to a remote area and I made it a point to pick up a little of the language plus a local indigenous language. But that plan backfired as I was sent on some crazy missions, unarmed in a war zone.

Although military training can teach you how to endure physical and mental strain far beyond you thought possible, I do not recommend it for most people. Speaking of my experience with USA, I would recommend considering the Peace Corps. The emphasize language learning and you must have it for your 27 month tour. You will get classes to be able to pass language exams but it is helpful to have previous knowledge of the language.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I was thinking of all those companies who got hit for dealing with Iran.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyqtor
  • 1746

Persian is spoken by a very large community in the US, too...

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceForce

Moreover DL could bill a course for Persian as the language of Rumi, described as America's most popular poet nowadays.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langophobe

How many governments does DL deal with? It has nothing to do with the French government or Welsh government but it teaches those languages.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ausir

Duolingo has an Arabic course, which uses the same script, so there are no technical challenges there anymore.

And Persian isn't spoken only in Iran.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessePaedia

Is the Persian the new Finnish?

They can't just add every language at once. You can still use Memrise, anki, and YouTube in the meantime.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blurflux

Yes. Yes, Persian is the new Finnish.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoolKangar

Let's have Old Avestan instead of Persian! xd

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

Especially since Persian is in pretty high demand these days, it seems a bit weird. Did you know some people who are from Pakistan speak Persian? Lots of people from Pakistan work in America, but of course they know English. Still, if you want to impress someone, know even a little bit of their language.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david395057

I was always under the impression that Maori people were quite possessive of their language and were not keen for people outside of their society to use it - my parents went to NZ and bought a phrasebook/dictionary (actually as a souvenir for me) and one lady saw them holding it and spoke to them at length about how many people would actually find it offensive to have an outsider attempt to speak their language.

In Europe we have an idea that learning a language is a mark of respect (i.e. a few phrases in the local language when you go on holiday) but I think there are places in the world where that connotation does not hold true.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

There is a tiny minority who are like that (a choir I was singing in was verbally attacked for singing a waiata - and no, we didn't mangle it) but it is rare. At the moment there is actually a push for making Maori language compulsory at school.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinMcKin7

For quite a few years people have been encouraged to learn the language, and Māori people I've known have been delighted if anyone at all shows an interest. The kind of offensiveness that you describe is, however, associated with Māori artifacts (e.g. carvings, paintings) that have been taken out of the country without permission.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cath529385

Great, I really want to learn Maori - when will the course be ready for enrolment?

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbsrule

Some time in the next 3-36 months, I suppose

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cath529385

Lol thought it was too good to be true...

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

Guess I will have to hurry up and wait.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceForce

This mutt would find the course handy next time he runs across a long-lost tattoo-faced Maori kinsman at a grocery store in Berkeley, California, just like in '09! Anyway, regarding the need for more African courses, several years ago I read that Zulu was headed to the Incubator, but haven't heard a word about it since.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzlaanMans

Okay good to hear that a new language has been added but what about farsi. Thousands of people want it to make to duolingo. Why aren't they listening to us omg. It's becoming like a dream. Eagerly waiting for farsi. Hope it'll make soon as arabic has made it's way. insha'Allah

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartoszCza10

Such a wonderful news! Though i broadly agree that there should be more focus on huge, and somehow sidelined languages, like Persian, Tamil or Bengali.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jordan_Leeper

I don't know much of the language but I am still very excited to learn it!

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nyagret

+1 for indigenous languages being added to Duolingo.

And I will always forgo anything displayed on .twitch.tv, because that's an AWS (Amazon Web Service) site. I boycott everything/anything owned/provided by Amazon, which includes AWS.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ehartz

Have you read this? It was alarming to find out that it's pretty difficult to entirely block AWS from your life.

I certainly don't want to discourage you from using Duolingo (Duolingo is awesome!), but Duolingo also uses AWS, including for TTS (text-to speech).

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyqtor
  • 1746

Yeah, was just about to post that... Ivona, Duolingo's main TTS provider formerly based in Poland, was bought by Amazon a while ago (they renamed it to Amazon Polly).

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbsrule

For a while I was buying from Book Depository to avoid Amazon, but then I discovered they're owned by Amazon. I feel your pain.

However, speaking as someone who develops e-commerce websites for a living, I think the only real way to avoid Amazon at present is to stay off the internet. AWS is almost ubiquitous.

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

I fondly recall the days before the Internet, computers and cell phones. Life was so much simpler. No Internet but you had to learn the Dewey Decimal System to find books in the library. The ubiquitous things were Ma Bell, one phone system to rule them all, and the draft board that was eager to provide you with travel opportunities (whether you like them or not) to foreign lands after you got out of high school unless you had egregious physical ailments like bone spurs that allowed you to play sports but were somehow bad for combat. Funny thing was, you got sent to a far away land to help the people but training did not include even one word of the language.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I loved the Dewey Decimal System and would wile away many hours discovering things on the shelves.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinCurran

Oh, yes! The hours I've spent in the 150s, the 810s and the 820s... :-) I miss browsing libraries and even using card catalogs (crazy, right?).

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I loved libraries then and still do now. We are, in fact, spoiled now. I have 45 books or audiobooks checked out at this time, plus five on hold. Now that's crazy! Our library also has an inter-library loan system and if I can't find a title locally I can order it from linked libraries all over the state. Our main branch has over 1.6 million items, and then there are 23 satellite branches. I've volunteered for them. Sometimes I think I should have been a librarian. =D

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

I'm the same way with this gluten free diet thing. My wife tells me I don't know what it is. I tell her it's like sugar and fat are bad for you...that's gluten. Anything bad for you = gluten.

Edit: OK, I 'fess up and admit I got that bit from Seth Rogan in the opening scenes of the movie "End of the World".

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Besides the people with celiac disease, I found out that humans aren't equipped to digest gluten. The body responds with inflammation. In the end, we are able to process wheat, but we'd be healthier without it. Google it if you don't believe me. I try to cook a lot of brown rice and veggies, and have cut way back on bread.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 107

Two of my kids have coeliac disease, but their gastroenterologist actually advised AGAINST removing it from the diet of the rest of the family. Gluten is a major source of protein in our diet, and people have been eating it for at least 14,000 years, by the latest evidence I've seen, so we've had plenty of time to adapt to it.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I've heard it has been cultivated for around 10,000 years. What is that "latest evidence" you have seen? I do appreciate it when people cite their sources. At any rate, homo sapiens have been around for 200,000 years, so what they discovered 10,000 years ago doesn't necessarily have to be a good thing. Some have suggested that we discovered it due to a famine, and people found that by processing it they could eat it. Wheat protein (gluten) is generally a poor protein source (15% of the quality of lactalbumin for growth) (National Research Council, 2003). My son also was gluten-intolerant, and thankfully he has now been able to re-introduce wheat. I am not an anti-wheat warrior. However, the wheat we have today is not the same as what we had even a hundred years ago. Wheat is a grass which we cannot eat in its natural state. Personally I prefer raw and natural foods over processed ones. Also, one should consider the economic interests behind any forces who may lobby for us to continue eating wheat, or to leave it completely (e.g. producers of gluten-free products). Here are some informational videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eO3cIrNEuIc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8X6v6Dc8Vw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjU1xcoB8pk https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/wheat-protein

Unfortunately I was unable to find the TedTalk that inspired our reduction in eating wheat. If anyone finds some good informational material, please comment here!

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 107

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44846874

This was just one of the popular science write-ups.

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Ha ha, Songve, how you have made me digress! My apologies. Nutrition has always been one of my more passionate interests.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmohB

Duolingo uses AWS quite extensively, so where do you draw the line?

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjar017

Yay! Dream come true

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isnottogive

YESSS, just the news I needed to brighten up an awful day!!!

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I'm really happy that endangered languages are here on Duolingo, to preserve them. And help people from a culture to keep their roots.

Now, Duo, add Pashtun!

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giselle12885

YES! This is great news!

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hiro_04

This is great, they recently added Finnish, Scottish Gaelic and now this.

Of the major languages they're still missing Thai, Tagalog, Icelandic, Persian, Ahmaric and Serbo-Croation.

Also, I'm all for regional/ minority languages like Quecha, Bengali, and Cantonese.

Generally I support Duo's journey. Hope it improves more and be the one-stop when it comes to learning the basics.

October 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronson832001

Awesome! Keen to give it a whirl

October 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belstar128

Why are you adding all these rare languages don't you like money i know many people who want to learn more Asian and African languages.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanase4367

I agree. Duolingo needs to add more Asian and African languages which are largely lacking.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielVanD18

Some African languages are hard to add, because they don’t have writing, or some things cannot be expressed in writing. Asian languages would be easier though.

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goodtimes_Gordon

In the entire continent, there are only THREE (3)African languages that are even used at government level, in publications or taught as the primary language in schools - Amharic, Somali and Swahili.

The rest still use colonial European languages for all official purposes, despite their rhetoric.

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blurflux

Aside from those, Nigeria's Yoruba is spoken by millions of people, is somewhat mutually intelligible with a few languages in Benin AFAICT, and is a ritual language for minority religious groups in Cuba, Brazil and Puerto Rico, as well as the source of much of the vocabulary of Brazil's LGBT argot (pajubá). And I think our chances of getting a Yoruba course are bigger than a Nigerian Pidgin English one, in spite of the BBC broadcast in the language.

October 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tizerman

carbsrule, as a host/genuine contributor, do you really not see how you are being connected with the entity which calls itself "Songve" ?

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

Tena koe, tizerman. This is the entity that calls itself Songve. We are all inter-connected, that seems to be the way the universe works and I am just part of it and have nothing to do with creating it. Although you have edited your post slightly, I am still wondering what you mean by it. It seems a tad negative to me and so be it if it is. It would help me understand you better if you could put it in a different way. What does carbsrule have to do with me? Or me with him?

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Yes, that is a strange post. When I am not sure of a user's gender I use "they," not "it." Hopefully tizerman or tizerwoman will revisit this thread and explain itself. :)

October 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

However it may play out, I am not and will not be offended. Tizerperson does have a unique way with words. My motto is "People can call me anything but late for dinner."

October 3, 2019
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