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  5. "Marcus makes a long journey …

"Marcus makes a long journey to the city."

Translation:Marcus iter longum ad urbem facit.

October 1, 2019

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaryllis515864

‘In urbem’ would make more sense. ‘Ad urbem’ means that he won’t enter the city.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

Ad urbem, movement to the city

Ab urbem, movement away from the city

The memory trick I use is

ad, like adhere (+) ab, like abnormal (-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

ab takes the ablative and it should be ab urbe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

If Marcus lived close to the city, "in urbem" would make sense, but if he lives some distance away, it would not make sense. I think it is understood that once he reaches the city he will enter it, just as it is understood that if I say that I am making a journey to a particular location that I will enter it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.vkDw

What about a different word order; when is it arbitrary and when is it not, are the adjectives after the nouns, what about the verbs and accusative? I did it like this: Marcus facit iter longum ad urbem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The others word order are okay, I think as long as you keep "ad urbem" together. So, report them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin_the_Grey

Same, I also said, "Marcus facit iter longum ad urbem." with its correction being "Marcus iter longum ad urbem facit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Asmo

I think "iter facit" order shouldn't be changed. Also, I recommend using verb as a last word in sentence as Latin mostly uses SOV (Subject-Object-Verb) order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacques979754

Why isn't "iter" accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It is accusative. Iter is a neuter 3rd declension (which means the accusative is the same as the nominative for both singular and plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjbaroff

I wrote "Marcus iter facit ad urbem longum" but was marked wrong. Is that me getting it wrong or the computer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue_Parkes

I'm merely a beginner but doesn't the adjective (longum) have to be next to the noun (iter) thus - Marcus iter longum facit ad urbem. I'll have a go at using this next time to check.

Yes, seems to be OK that way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie839392

I am writing the correct answer and it is not accepting it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesMonaro

Is something wrong with this? If so, what? "Marcus longum ad urbem iter facit" (rejected)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedBaron-C

I am wondering the same thing. I also typed this and was marked wrong and am curious as to why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phloemxylem

Why is city not dative case (for indirect object)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The preposition ad takes an accusative, not a dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phloemxylem

With you there! I am thinking Marcus = subject, iter=direct object, so wondering why city would not be indirect, perhaps indicating a diff preposition? Trying to square this with where dative shows up elsewhere in Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

This link may help with understanding when the dative is appropriate (or at least hopefully be of some help): http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/dative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phloemxylem

Thanks! This looks like a great resource I will have to begin using it. Doing a bit more review I think I am incorrect to consider "city" an indirect object, rather I should have called it object of a prepositional phrase--if we were to give this any case, I think it would be Instrumental, which I haven't seen as part of Latin.

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