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  5. "Hic mus non est canis."

"Hic mus non est canis."

Translation:This mouse is not a dog.

October 2, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

However, this other mouse is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hydrntc

Is this impkying that the others are dogs?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

This is a mouse not a dog = Hic est mus non canis.
Word order matters here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GunnarRica

"hic mus non est canis" does that mean this is flat out wrong? Or is it just translated differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Couldn't it be, like in Indonesian, also "the" here? (even if it would be second meaning)

As "hic" is sometimes used to disambiguate the non existent defined article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyOra

Harry Dresden, is that your Mouse... I mean, dog? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephanus556864

Half chow and half woolly mammoth. A woolly chammoth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c0cYAB2S

the accent should not be in "hic" because it sounds like a single word: "hicmus"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikAnders705000

"This mouse is no dog" should be correct too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

I think your translation is correct, but it's a bit stilted or even bordering on archaic in modern English. I'm guessing you're thinking of "kein" in German ("Diese Maus ist kein Hund"), which is usually translated as "not a," rather than "no," in 21st-century English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyOra

I think it is still used in modern English when one wants to emphasise the negation. Like, if someone just claimed it was a dog, and I underline "this is no dog", it feels a little stronger, maybe even dismissive, than just "is not a dog".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XShria

As opposed to other mice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eden92278

The voice spells "haec", not "hic".

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