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"You are shouting in the theater."

Translation:In theatro exclamatis.

October 2, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I used clāmātis instead of exclāmātis; they are synonyms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, Exclamare has an additional meaning, to exclaim.

*Exclāmo (exclāmare) *

1 to exclaim, to shout
2 to cry out, to call out


*Clāmo (clāmare): *

1 to proclaim, to declare
2 to cry or to shout out shout or to call name of
3 to accompany with shouts

Which one is the louder?
Both can be to proclaim? (found elsewhere)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

There's also a prōclāmāre in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanMoore657526

Both exclamatis and clamatis mean basically the same thing. Clamatis means you shout and exclamatis means you shout out (Ex means out).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

Maybe it's just me, but the first thing that came to mind was: "It's behind you!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrKuczar

exclāmāre (present indicative active): exclāmō, exclāmās, exclāmat, exclāmāmus, exclāmātis, exclāmant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8uEoiS18

Why not in theatrum? Isn't that the object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It's the difference between in + ablative case (like in theātrō ), where "in" means "IN" or "ON," and in + accusative case (like in theātrum ) , where "in" means "INTO or "ONTO."

Keep in mind that Latin has three different cases for "object": dative, accusative, ablative.

Both the accusative and ablative cases can function as objects of prepositions; the accusative also serves for direct object of the verb. Dative serves for indirect object of the verb.

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