1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "I bring cookies to the girls…

"I bring cookies to the girls and the boys."

Translation:Crustula ad puellas et pueros porto.

October 4, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JvMachado96

Can't we use the dative case in this sentence?

"Crustula puellis et pueris porto."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

That was also my question. I seem to remember being able to do that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, it allows dative: "Hic vobis bellum et pacem portamus".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PandeXiongmao

Why ”Crustula puellis et pueris porto” is not accepted here? The usage of the preposition ”ad” does not sound natural here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saxton507012

Can anyone explain to me why the plural of 'girls' is 'puellas' and not 'puellae' in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The preposition ad expects the accusative, so we have to put girls into the accusative plural puellas.

puellae as a plural is either the nominative or the vocative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

The girls are not the subject in this sentence (I am) so they take the accusative, for direct objects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudyGoldich

Crustula ad puellas et ad pueros porto was rejected. I repeated the preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bird_king_73

So weren't using "porto" as "I bring" instead of "I carry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's both, so only the context could make you use "bring" or "carry".

Lewis:

to bear or carry along; to convey any thing heavy
To bear, carry, bring (mostly poetic)
To endure, bear, suffer (Late Latin)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deusexmatter

Why pueros instead of pueri?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It, along with puellas, are with ad and ad requires nouns to be in an accusative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNorCal

Why is it "crustula" and not "crustulas"? Is it not in the accusative plural case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The accusative plural for crustulum is crustula (it's a neuter second declension noun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

But we just used crustulum as accusative in the sentence just prior to this one... so it's nearly impossible to get a fix on what is accurate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

You would have used crustulum as the accusative singular, not the accusative plural. I would highly recommend using a chart or table that gives you the case endings for the different declensions if you are having trouble remembering all the different endings.

Here is a site that has tables for the five declensions: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/case-endings-five-declensions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

Does "fero" work here too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetroniusFelis

This has got to be the fifth time I've missed this just because i said "boys and girls" instead of "girls and boys". I suppose I can see the justification for calling that wrong, but it's just frustrating, is all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juan337023

"PUELLIS ET PUERIS CRUSTULA PORTO" SHOULD BE ACCEPTED


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

I thought "eo" meant "I go" like eunt means "they go"?

I said, Crustula porto puellas et pueros eo. Could someone please break down what I did wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

eo does mean "I go", but you don't say in English: "I go I bring cookies to the girls and the boys." The same with Latin, eo isn't added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Ah! Thank you for the explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AfonsoWang

ad pueros et puellas porto crustula


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/memoryLang

Why ad not ab?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

ad is 'to, towards'

ab is 'from, away'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

what's wrong with "ad puellas et pueros porto crustula"?

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.