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  5. "Pavones esuriunt."

"Pavones esuriunt."

Translation:The peacocks are hungry.

October 7, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Velociraptores esuriunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

Oh, gosh. Hope this doesn't turn into another "Psittacus ebrius" series... With hungry peacocks eating people and bread, and people destroying them with fire...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsittaciEbrii

A problem with drunk parrots ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul704844

Why not " The peacocks hunger"? "Hunger" is an intransitive verb, and matches the Latin form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

Agreed, I had the same instinct. I've reported it as an answer that should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honcongensis

The `u' is pronounced too long on the audio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilarymcca5

sounds like 'esurioni' - reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrKuczar

The peacocks are esurient.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

And the parrots are thirsty...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henroriro

They are hungry for peacocks vs the peacocks are hungry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

This is a good question.

My guess would be that it must be the latter, because in order to be the former << esurire> would need to take a direct object and mean "to be hungry for something" (compare the French verb << chercher > ). I'd need someone who's studied Latin formally to confirm that for me though.

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