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https://www.duolingo.com/msquaredb

Where to continue/expand practice after Duolingo?

What have users found to be the best source of practice after Duolingo? I will continue to keep my grammar refreshed here, but I think I need more thorough practice with some of the later tenses. I really wish I had a conversation partner, but I don't. I am sure that would be the best option, but it wont available for a month or two.

Any helpful supplemental sites or programs would be greatly appreciated! I am trying my hand at translation on Duolingo and have started using Readlang already.

Thanks in advance!

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kiroskiw

Read Harry Potter and the Philosopher Stones, it's easy and fun but it still contains a lot of vocabulary .

Try watching your favorite TV shows dubbed in Spanish, you'll remember what's the story is so you can focus on understanding the words without being completely lost.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010

For me I don't think there will ever be an after DuoLingo. Even after completing my tree I suspect I will continue to maintain it. It's just a great way to review you skills. I'm hoping at some point that DuoLingo will do an advanced version. It's just such a great way to learn.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msquaredb

I do hope they continue to expand content. Additional vocab sections would be useful as would more thorough imperfect/subjunctive lessons with questions forcing you to differentiate between preterite/imperfect and indicative/subjunctive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vatsanshuman

If you want to have a conversation partner, I would like you to have a look at this website http://app.wespeke.com/connect . Here you can have a conversation with the native speakers. I hope it helps. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010

Thanks so much. Your link goes to the sign in page. I have included here a link to their home page. It looks to be a great learning tool.

http://en-us.wespeke.com/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgm_7

1) Skype- For spoken and written skills where your mistakes can be corrected.

2) Try changing your phone, computer, laptop etc. language settings to your chosen language so it requires you to always think in that language. You will also learn knew vocabulary.

3) Try listening to music in the language. There are a lot of Spanish covers to popular English songs which you may like!

4) Similar to Skype but you can go on online chat rooms in the language you are learning.

5) Try and watch Spanish TV online, or videos in Spanish on Youtube. Make sure there is no English in the video, you will eventually pick up some words.

6) Challenge yourself to think in the language you learn, excluding any English from your thoughts.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msquaredb

Excellent suggestions! I had never thought of switching my electronic devices to another language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgm_7

It's a great idea for vocab! And also, it excludes all English from your head :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurahale

I've done that (because I bought the laptop in Spain and I have problems getting English to stay as the default), and I don't find it helps at all except in terms of passive recognition.

Escritorio is desktop. Apagar is to shut down. I see these all the time. I cannot remember them when they come up in other contexts. There are other downsides. If you use a lot of keyboard shortcuts, you need to learn them anew. [ctrl]-B instead of [ctrl]-F is one of the annoying ones for me. I cannot figure out the Spanish equivalent for [ctrl]-a (select all) and it frequently actually is a shortcut for shutting down the program.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgm_7

But I'm guessing the OP's laptop/computer or phone was bought in an English speaking country so the shortcuts will be the same no matter what language it is changed to :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurahale

Have you actually done this? Change the default language for your OS? The keyboard shortcuts change with the language settings. This is at least the case for Windows operating systems.

And it still doesn't teach you the language, except passively.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgm_7

Yes my iPad is in Italian and when I am even more comfortable, I will change my laptop settings to Italian. The OP asked on methods of further practice after Duolingo, I suggested this for vocabulary learning, not the whole language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottON

Look at seƱor Jordan on YouTube. He explained loads of things that I'd wondered when doing my tree. His teaching style is very interactive and he makes it good fun.

I'll also add that there's a great Anki course based around assimil . It's got audio and will expose you to a lot of new vocab and sentence structures.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobbieL
BobbieL
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There's an A2 Spanish MOOC in progress on Miriada X from the University of Salamanca. You could look that up and see if registration is still open.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KNR_27
KNR_27
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I second the suggestion below about reading Harry Potter. When I was trying to improve / relearn / expand my German, ten years or more after college (having not given the language much thought in between, and zero practice), the series was still being written. I read them all in order in German (I had not read them in English). Later I re-read them in French, to help learn French. (You sort of know what is going to happen, but you learn to consciously half-forget, half suspend your remembrance process).

They work great because they use a lot of the vocabulary over again, and it really embeds that vocabulary (even if mostly passively).

After those I read Agatha Christie novels (Poirot was fondly remembered from childhood), then Henning Mankel & Per Wahloo mysteries, and others. Then watched a lot of TV series and US movies dubbed into German. Any series is good, however, in that the unfamiliar phrasings, preferred vocabulary and idioms are tough work on the first novel, but then they get repeated each novel, so they get reinforced. Any half-remembered favorite book is also good. Even books that aren't that well written can often be good -- later on you will know enough to recognize all the hackneyed phrases, and cliches, but when you are still learning, they can still come off as 'fresh' and 'original'.

4 years ago