1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Mother and father usually sl…

"Mother and father usually sleep."

Translation:Mater et pater dormire solent.

October 10, 2019

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sparkyalbatross

Solent seems to take the infinitive - is "usually" a loose translation, for a more literal "are accustomed to" or "make it a habit to" or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, it's literally "to be accustomed to...", but it can also be translated with the adv "usually", as it's an habit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

how come 'sleep' is in the infinitive here? shouldn't it be dormiunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JkumC5vF

Soleo means "be used to", so the literal translation is "they are used to sleep", therefore sleep is the infinitive "dormire"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Exodus082020

Thank you! I was so confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

thanks. 'soleo' seems to be one of those situations when there is one word to describe/express something that in other languages needs several words. Meaning maybe that it cannot really be translated literally.... What category of words does 'soleo' fall into? - verb, adverb, adjective....? Doesn't 'solitus' mean 'usually' or 'commonly' - 'solitus' being an adverb...?Doesn't 'dormire solitus' mean 'to usually sleep' (during the night, lets say)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

'soleo' seems to be one of those situations when there is one word to describe/express something that in other languages needs several words.

Right.

What category of words does 'soleo' fall into? - verb, adverb, adjective....?

It's a verb in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

is the 'soleo' a passive (versus active) verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorken1

"So I mostly hang out with the weasel and the parrot."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

first comment on duo that makes me chuckle.:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xuu37

Only now I just realised that this is a verb and not an adjective. Wouldn't it be better to translate it accordingly? Like they use to sleep? Very confusing otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Like they use to sleep?

We don't say that in English.

"used to" is only used in the past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

The meaning 'to use to x' can be used in the present in English, but then it's usually used as an adverb ('usually'). However 'usually' isn't derived from the verb 'to use', it rather derives from the adjective 'usual' (in sentences like this: "He says the usual things", or "It is usual for them to sleep at night"). So you can say here 'it is usual for them to sleep'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Oddly enough, I've met native speakers that say use to do X in the present to mean a habit. Must be a regionalism, then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

I think you mean "used to sleeping"

"Used to sleep" is past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

actually not in this context. As 'used to' is meant here in the sense of BEING used to do x. 'used' here in English is the passive version. Another example like that would be 'Being MADE to do x' (where 'made' is the passive of the verb 'to make')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

I'm having a difficult time associating solent with "accustomed to" or usually. Do we have a counterpart word or concept in english, to help me remember?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

Well in English you cannot say 'they unusually sleep' (you can say 'they sleep unusually', but that means something different altogether). For 'unusual' here for our sentence it is the same: 'it is unusual for them to sleep' in English. In latin....I am not sure. One has to add a 'not' somewhere,....Mater et pater dormire non solent - maybe?

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.