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"Minerva sees a shield and an enemy."

Translation:Minerva scutum et hostem videt.

October 10, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

We could also use atque instead of et.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

Does "atque" just fit into the same position as "et"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes: Minerva scutum atque hostem videt.

Given that atque is at least sometimes used to add on a more significant second element , I think that would work well with this sentence.

An equivalent to "et" is the particle "-que," which gets added to the second element:

Minerva scutum hostemque videt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

That is excellent information to have! Thank you very much for that.

I appreciate your comment the other day about indirect declarations, as well. Thanks very much for being willing to share your expertise on Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You're very kind to say all that; I enjoy visiting the site when people ask questions/ make comments, and if I think I have anything to say, as you see, I go ahead and say it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

By the way, is there any significant semantic difference between the structures “X et Y” and “X Y-que”?

Or are there particular situations or environments in which one or the other is not correct or not as desirable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matteus708236

Et- Two things have little connection besides being grouped together i.e- The men and dogs Atque- Things are often grouped together like "boys and girls" -Que- The things form and integrsl part of a whole e.g. "Macoroni and Cheese" At the same time note these are not hard and fast rules


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Since I don't have an answer to that, I will refrain--hope others with more expertise will tell us.

(I have not observed any difference, and the -que can join individual words or whole clauses, just as et does, in my experience.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I'd suggest an et... et structure, for the 2 things Minerva sees: Minerva et scutum et hostem videt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

We could also use atque instead of et.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Languages127

Is this a metaphor for ignorant people?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PullGerman

Should I be able to say something like: "minerva scutum et inimicum videt"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Note that hostis and inimīcus are not precisely the same thing.

The hostis is a "public enemy," which is to say an enemy of everyone in the same country/tribe/nation; whereas the inimīcus is a "private" enemy (or rival) within the same country/tribe/nation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PullGerman

Thanks a lot for the additional explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Thanks to you, too! You're certainly welcome!

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