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"The quiet old man and the quiet woman are sleeping."

Translation:Senex tacitus et femina tacita dormiunt.

October 11, 2019

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliewilman

We are not told that she is an "old" woman, nor whether they sleep together. So why am I put in mind of King David and Abishag the Shunammite, an ancient solution to the lack of electric blankets?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

Why can't I use "taciti" to modify both subjects? It seems odd to repeat tacitus/tacita.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because this sentence is teaching you that "tacitus" is singular masculine nominative and "tacita" is singular feminine nominative. It's a two-for-one. Otherwise it would have prompted with "The quiet man and woman are sleeping."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

It does seem odd, and clunky. I tried "Senex tacitus tacitaque femina dormiunt," but it wasn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tigaud1

The coordination is between Senex and Femina. Maybe you could try "Senex tacitus tacita feminaque dormiunt" ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think you want the -que at the end of the first new element that's being added.

How about "Senex tacitus feminaque tacita dormiunt" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tigaud1

Yes, you're right. On the model of Senatus Populusque Romanus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniDi78082

No it's not right. The app just misses lots of combinations because the language is relatively new in it. Go and flag it. This flags are much needed, since Latin allows much more liberties than other modern languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LegoGuy87

Why can't I use just "tacita" for the quiet girl?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolangage

Why « x » to sene(?) and not « s » ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tigaud1

Because the adjective is "Senex, senis" ; The nominative singular is Senex.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

There's no 'reason,' really, except that's what it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelKJ

Why is not placidus/placida accepted instead of tacitus/ tacita?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Placidus is "calm".
Tacitus is "quiet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelKJ

Uncertain what you're trying to tell me. This exercise is one of translating English to Latin. Both placidus and tacitus are capable of having many English translations. Tacitus leans towards the sense of 'not speaking', 'silent', which can be extended to 'quiet'. Placidus can mean placid, quiet, calm. Asked to translate the 'quiet old man', etc, 'placidus', I think, is a fair choice of adjective. I suppose what you're saying is that, simplistic though it be, you have to use the one pre-ordained choice of word. Tacitus = quiet so any other adjective wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Rem acū tetigistī , Nigel! (Yes, it seems to be that simple.)

That's the Latin expression for "you've hit the nail on the head," literally, "you have touched the thing/matter with a needle."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mistibamwhat

Why is sunt not used in the translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

dormiunt covers the entire 'are sleeping' from the English. Putting sunt dormiunt would not be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You only use sunt when you're expressing:

WHERE "they are": In forō sunt , They are in the forum.

WHO or WHAT "they are": Senātōrēs sunt , They are senators. (Verb "to be" + a predicate noun)

Laetī sunt , They are happy. (Verb "to be" + a predicate adjective)

Any time they are DOING something, you do not use sunt , since Latin doesn't use "helping verbs" the way English does.

Latin dormiunt = They sleep (simple present) and also = They are sleeping (present progressive) and also = They do sleep: The latter is the form we use in negatives (They don't sleep) and in questions (Do they sleep? They sleep, don't they?)

So, English has 3 ways to translate each Latin "action" verb (in the present tense).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela68573

I wrote tacita twice ,but still marked wrong why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because you need gender agreement. It's Senex tacitus et femina tacita dormiunt. "Tacitus" is masculine and "tacita" is feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiltrud607387

Are there any " old women" in Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

There is anus (4th declension, genitive anūs) that means 'old woman'. Not to be confused with ānus (2nd declension, genitive ānī).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/247black

Senes tacitus et femina tacita dormiunt sunt.

Why would this be incorrect????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Senēs is a plural: "the old men." The singular "old man" in the nominative is senex .

You have two separate verbs in your sentence: "they sleep they are." In Latin, dormiunt by itself = they sleep / they are sleeping / they do sleep.

Senex tacitus et fēmina tacita dormiunt is a complete Latin sentence.

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