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  5. "Quot aureos habetis?"

"Quot aureos habetis?"

Translation:How many gold pieces do you have?

October 12, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

An Aureus gold coin = 25 Dēnārius Dēnāriī coins

A Dēnārius = 10 As Asses Bronze or Copper coins

A Sēstertius Bronze or Silver coin = 2 1/2 Asses coins

Sēstertius: Sēmis (half) + tertius (third)

4 Sesterces = 1 Dēnārius
100 Sesterces = 1 Aureus

Dēnārius - ten of something

Staphylococcus aureus σταφυλή-o-coccus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7ga4Ktv4

i typed how much gold do you have despite seeing it was plural. would that be "quot aureus habetis", or whatever the singular is? or does aureus specifically mean a gold piece, (whatever that is).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxnoxnox

An aureus (n.) is specifically a gold coin, yes, which comes from aureus, aurea, aureum (adj.) "golden". The metal itself is aurum (n.):

"How much gold do you have?" -> Quantum aurum habētis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Note: "Quot" is always for a countable thing. (How many, not how much)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaneBrandes

It should accept gold coins


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schnueffi

If "gold pieces" is accepted, why isn't "gold nuggets"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxnoxnox

"Gold pieces" means "gold coins." It can't be interpreted as "pieces of gold" in English. Compare with "pieces of bread" (not *"bread pieces").

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