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  5. "Hic canis est iratus."

"Hic canis est iratus."

Translation:This dog is angry.

October 14, 2019

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Many Latin clause and phrase types have typical word order in which Verb-Final is less common : Latin Word OrderVerb Positions • Latin Word Order ThoughtcoLatin Word OrderLatin Word Order • Initial Verb, Penultimate Verb, Final Verb, Agentless Verb, Emphatic Verb, Topic Verb, Verb To Be, Existential Verb, Location Verb, Copula Verb, Auxiliary Verb • In many Latin genres the verb final position is much less common. Over the centuries, verb-final main clauses became less common. In the writing of Egeria (Aetheria) of about A.D. 380, only 25% of main clauses and 37% of subordinate clauses are verb-final.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

I had serious trouble discerning the meaning of the spoken text. It sounded like exciratus, which I had to reject because it wasn't in Wiktionary. I finally realised the verb was in the wrong position (Duolingo is sadly pushing SVO in the name of teaching flexibility rather than proper word position) and that the c I kept hearing wasn't supposed to be there. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxnoxnox

I finally realised the verb was in the wrong position (Duolingo is sadly pushing SVO in the name of teaching flexibility rather than proper word position)

Esse as a copula is very frequently found in SVO order in Latin. This is entirely natural and usual. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_word_order#The_verb_%22to_be%22)

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