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  5. "In sella sedere potes."

"In sella sedere potes."

Translation:You can sit in the chair.

October 16, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanPaul80213

Shouldn't it be "You can sit on the chair"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Both could be correct, depending on the type of chair.

I think the general word would be more "seat" than "chair" to describe any kind of "chairs", deep one, like armchairs, sofa, benches, etc... But it seems that "chair" is also used as a general word (umbrella term).

Sit in —
An armchair, a beanbag

Sit on —
A dining chair, a stool, a bench

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/72831/sit-in-a-chair-vs-sit-on-a-chair

I think they should select "on" if it's really a chair, not the umbrella term, in their suggested correction.

I have no idea if "sella" was an umbrella term in Latin or described a specific kind of chair, the common one.

But I know that "sella" gave "sellette" in French, and also "selles" meaning stools (oh, same thing in English with "stool", funny), meaning feces.

The original meaning was "aller à la selle" = go to the "selle" = going to sit on the thing you know, described as a chair (but a stool in English, stool was originally a chair, before the word "chair" was borrowed to French "chair", because the German for chair is still "Stuhl")

It also gave the word "selle" in French, meaning a saddle. Because we sit on it.

And in Spanish, "sella" became "silla".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

"Là où le roi va seul?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I've had a look at some sellae. Early ones seem to have a flat surface to sit on, with no back support (sella curulis) but later developments provided a strip of supporting material across the back, Either way, they were nor "armchairs" in the modern sense, so I would say "sit on" fits better than "sit in". Even now, you would sit in an armchair but sit on a chair, or even sit on a sofa. To "sit in" needs a sense of enclosure, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klite123

Why not "You MAY sit in the chair?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

possum, here potes, is about the ability to do something opposed to being allowed or permitted to do something. That's probably why it is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klite123

Then how do you express being permitted in Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Indeed. That is frequently what we really mean.

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