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  5. "Culina caseum olet."

"Culina caseum olet."

Translation:The kitchen smells of cheese.

October 16, 2019

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pootle15

Reakly hoping it would be "The kitchen smells of owl"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPNash

Culina bubonem olet. Psittaci ebrii et mustelae perfidae bubones coquunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryHrusch

Perhaps cheese-stuffed owl


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elix24

Is "caseum" accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

Yes. Seems like it should be a different case, doesn't it? I'd have thought genitive made more sense here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

This sentence looks like a predicative expression [see Wikipedia about]. I wonder if it's ok to use the nominative instead of accusative in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Based on Lewis and Short, no, it is not used that way. It is used absolutely, with the accusative, or rarely with the ablative.

As far as I know, a predicate nominative is only used with forms of esse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vik_DWYV

Yes. Genitive "casei"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

Corinna stinks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbrasseau

I heard Corinna too lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPNash

Quid Corinna caseum olet? Quia Corinna in culinā cum caseō coquit. (Today's entry in Roman tongue twisters.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simplyElsie

What's wrong with 'The kitchen smells of the cheese'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

seems perfectly ok imho


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

That works. (The kitchen smells of the cheese) But it sounds a little more natural if you leave off the 2nd definite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

i think it should be "caseo" ablative. unless it is a living house like in some mst3k flick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

I was thinking ablative made more sense here, as well. Can someone in the know comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059:entry=oleo1

It says "constr. absol. or with acc., less freq. with abl. of that of which any thing smells" which, when decoded, means "constructed absolutely [that is, without an object or adjunct] or with accusative, less frequently with ablative of that of which any thing smells."

So in principle, you can use culina olet "the kitchen smells/stinks" or culina caseum olet "the kitchen smells of cheese" or culina caseo olet "the kitchen smells of cheese," though the third option is considerably less frequent than the second.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMcAyRuo

A living house? That doesn't sound too strange, considering we had drunk parrots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luksky07

For me "The kitchen smells cheese" is more natural, yet it isn't accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHarri227108

"The kitchen smells cheese" doesn't make sense because a kitchen cannot smell or otherwise sense like an animate being can.

Change it to "The kitchen smells cheesy", though, and you're good. I guess an adjective in that position allows for the meaning "smells like", which would also work. Whereas a noun in object position requires the meaning of active sensing rather than a passive giving off of an odor.

The problem is that, in English, the verb "smell" can mean either to give off an odor or to sense an odor, so be careful about how you use this verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

Et Corinna tam bene olet !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

Why not « the cheese « ?

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