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  5. "Plateae in urbe sunt."

"Plateae in urbe sunt."

Translation:The streets are in the city.

October 20, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asha95014

Which is a better translation of street, via or platea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I don't know the answer to that question; though I see, in the dictionary (OLD), that platea is a Greek loan-word, used by Plautus and Terence in comedies, and by classical writers (Caesar, Catullus, Horace, Livy, Vitruvius).

Other words for street include vicus, -i, m. (which can also mean district or quarter of a town); it's coupled with platea by Caesar in the sentence "vicos plateasque inaedificat," "he barricades the roads and streets."

There's also angiportum (-i, n.) / angiportus (-us, m.), for "narrow street" or "alley," with angi- made from the adj. angustus, a, um, narrow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElyseC4

Wouldn't roads also be an appropriate translation of plateae


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

The word is platēae -- the stress should be on the penultimate syllable (not the antepenultimate, which is here the first, syllable).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdkelly88

Why can't you translate this, "There are streets in the city."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

My guess is that that should be okay (and isn't it more idiomatic, in English?).

It's often said that, in Latin, starting the sentence with a form of "to be" is the equivalent of English "There is..." or "There are..." : Sunt plateae in urbe, There are streets in the city.

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