"Ille psittacus suaviter cantare potest."

Translation:That parrot can sing sweetly.

October 23, 2019

17 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

This is a humorous sentence, because in Classical Latin, when «ille» is placed either before or after a name, it can mean “the illustrious” or “the famous”, like «Alexander ille» or «ille Alexander». Cf. Cicero, Pro Archia, 24: «Quam multos scriptores rerum suarum magnus ille Alexander secum habuisse dicitur!». [It is said that the great Alexander had with him many writers of his deeds]. Of course in this sentence «ille» means "that", but I suppose the parrot has reached new heights with his status that we could now refer to him as «ille psittacus (ebrius)»!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

And "that"? Here it's rather "that"?

What would be the derogatory word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

iste could be used as a pejorative.

iste psittacus could be translated as "That no good parrot!" I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

Sure, but after a few drinks and a few fish on the floor, we all can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cquark

But is usually too drunk to do so, unfortunately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardVanc1

Unless he is drunk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaneBrandes

Maybe he requires libations to sing those bass notes sweetly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Infuzibil

The parrot is actually an undercover siren.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsabelaERL

By chance, the parrot is drunk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

Why isn't "softly" an acceptable translation for "suaviter"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psittacus_ebrius

suaviter is usually translated as: sweetly, agreeably, pleasantly.

Softly would be better translated as molliter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerseycitysteve

After a few pints, he'll sing Come on Eileen.

Isn't there other vocabulary to learn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lekto3

Question about english sentence: since "that parrot" is third person singular, why there is no a "-s" suffix in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The verb 'can' does not take an 's' in the third person singular. Modal verbs tend not to take the 's' in the third person. "That parrot can sing", "that parrot may sing", "that parrot must sing", etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelicGirl2

Reported the audio. Reason; she says mille not ille (or seems to perhaps due to editing and recording reasons)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison545959

She often seems to chew the first word. Something to do with the way it’s recorded I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pobble01

I wish the "hints" translated "suavis" correctly... When I used "softly" as in the hints, I was marked down...

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