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  5. "Nos litteris Latinis studemu…

"Nos litteris Latinis studemus."

Translation:We study Latin literature.

October 23, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerem92

What does "Nos" do in this sentence? I feel like if I take it out it would still be comprehensible and grammatically correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2766

Yes, subject pronouns are optional, but right now we're learning what they are and where they go when we do use them. Also, depending on how the prompt is formatted, it's the key part that tests your knowledge of verb conjugation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

The Tips give a nifty table of declensions that..... say nothing about the "is" ending (as on litteris).

Wiktionary says it's 1st fem, a dative or ablative plural. True?

And why dative, not accusative? It seems to me that Latin literature is directly the object that we're studying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2766

It's the direct object in English. In Latin, "studere" more accurately parses out as "to dedicate oneself to", therefore it takes the dative rather than the accusative.

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:studere

And yes, "littera" is a feminine noun which literally means "letter". In the plural it can mean "literature" (we still use that turn of phrase to this day: "a man of letters" for example)
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:littera


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex284997

My question was already answered in the comments. My other question is, where are these 'tips' everyone is talking about? I'm on the desktop version and i don't see any tips?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex284997

haha der. I guess i just got really used to ignoring that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxnoxnox

The verb studeo ("strive for, study, occupy oneself with") is special in that it takes a dative object, hence litterīs Latīnīs.

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