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  5. "Panis est fartus caseo."

"Panis est fartus caseo."

Translation:The bread is stuffed with cheese.

October 25, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

Really! That is where 'fart' comes from?! That's what it means?

looks like the bread is lactose intolerant I am 12 years old, mentally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxnoxnox

No, English fart and Latin fartus (past participle of farciō) are not etymologically related.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Old English feortan, ultimately from PIE *perd- (source also of Old High German ferzan, Old Norse freta, Danish fjerte, Sanskrit pard, Greek perdein, Lithuanian perdžiu, persti, Russian perdet), of imitative origin. Related: Farted; farting. As a noun, from late 14c.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/fart

But "flatulence" is from a Latin root:

flatulent (adj.) "affected by digestive gas," 1590s, from Middle French flatulent (16c.), from Modern Latin flatulentus, from Latin flatus "a blowing, breathing, snorting; a breaking wind," past participle of flare "to blow, puff," from PIE root *bhle- "to blow."

https://www.etymonline.com/word/flatulent

English has Germanic fart and a French-Latin fart!
2 ways of farting! How gross.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Fartus ( stuffed, full, filled ) • Farciō ( cram, stuff ) • ( Farce borrowed from Middle French farce - mystery play comic interlude, literally "stuffing" )

Cāseō Abl Dat Sing Cāseus • From PIE kwh₂et- ( to ferment, become sour ) • Cāseārius


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryHrusch

Duo, stop making me hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Why isn't "apud" (with) not included? Could one say, "Panis fartus apud caseo est."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wibke260819

"Apud" is more like "near, by". "With" is "cum". However, some verbs do not need prepositions in Latin where in English, they would.

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