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  5. "The architect builds the sta…

"The architect builds the stage."

Translation:Architectus scaenam construit.

October 30, 2019

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7szkm

What is the difference between "condit" and "construit"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt281606

Condit is more like "establishes", while construit is more like "constructs", though both have similar meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2774

"Construit" is primarily the physical act of building/constructing/assembling.

"Condit" can include that, but there is also the sense of founding/establishing etc. All of the stuff that needs to get done before the physical constructing can begin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcdaniel16

Why is it "Architectus" here and "cum architecto" else where... does it have something to do with the fact that in the second case the architect is not the person doing the action?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes, it has to do with which person is doing the action, the noun cases change based on how a noun modifies the sentence. Architectus is nominative and is used when the 'architect' is doing the action (it is also used with forms of esse).

Architecto is ablative and is used since the preposition cum is used (cum architecto : 'with a/the architect').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArielMedin948128

One is in the nominative case while the other is in the ablative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esthermations

"Architecta scaenam construit" was rejected, would architectus be used for a female architect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2774

This brings up a few questions:

  1. Do all job titles agree in gender with the person who holds them, or do some job titles just have their own grammatical gender irrespective of who holds them? ("La guardia" in Italian is a good example of a job title that is grammatically feminine irrespective of who holds the position.)

  2. Are we being taught Classical Latin as it was spoken (in which case, were any women doctors or architects back then?) or are we being taught modernized Classical Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNPrasanth

I'm no historian, but may I venture that anglice or hispanice are anachronistic and highly unlikely names for languages or culture's identified 3-9 centuries after rome fell, when respectively Angle/Saxon gothic tribes entered and ruled over indigenous; or mixed peninsular Iberian gaelic/moorish/roman descendants began identifying culture, language influence, and themselves as spanish, portuguese, basque... before the crusades culminated, just as their other romance contemporaries would have been?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

While anglice is most definitely an anachronism for ancient Rome, hispanice maybe not. Hispania as a province did exist in ancient Rome (mind you it was more than just modern day Spain) so they could have used a word like hispanice when talking about languages spoken in the area (of course it wouldn't at the time be a reference to modern Spanish/Castilian).

But you should note this course isn't really focused on teaching only Classical Latin vocabulary, and words like anglice and hispanice would have definitely been used at some point in the past 1000 years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNPrasanth

Thanks Moopish, Very true. Keeping perspective of dl's larger mission is important. And as you well point out, additionally, even a language such as Latin would have had to have evolved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dovlatus

Can one use aedificare here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2774

It's not currently in the answer database, but you can blaze the trail by using that verb (making sure your entire answer is spelled correctly and the verb is conjugated correctly), then when it marks you wrong, flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leafwhite

"architectus scaenam condit" marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2774

Construit, not condit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanychAZ

So, there is no way "condit" could be used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2774

That's right. "Condit" means "he founds" or "he establishes". You would use that verb if you're talking about an entire city. "Construit" as you can see looks like "constructs" and is used for literal building of individual things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phaidon012

What's the difference between scaena and theater?

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