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  5. "Forte ad arborem advenimus."

"Forte ad arborem advenimus."

Translation:By chance we arrive at the tree.

November 2, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Verb is pronounced "ad-VAY-ni-mus" instead of "ad-ven-EE-mus," thus it's "we arrived," not present-tense "we arrive."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ludo-Teca

Right. I was about to make the same comment. I've reported it (The audio does not sound correct).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

¿Why not ‘perhaps’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoryLCh

We arrive by chance at the tree

Not yet accepted, reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(Seems to be just a 'word order in English' problem.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vulcanman

Is it possible to say "Forte, arborem advenimus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

No; a verb like advenīre is by definition an intransitive verb; it cannot govern a direct object. The thing that one "arrives at"( or "comes into") needs to be in a prepositional phrase ( ad arborem ) ; authors will use ad + accusative for this, or in + accusative.

You might see, "He will arrive at Rome tomorrow": Rōmam crās adveniet . But there it can be pointed out that the names of cities (and towns and small islands) have a special "accusative of the end of motion" use, that dispenses with the preposition.

Still, with the verb "to arrive," there's no "WHAT" you arrive ( = a direct object of the verb), only a "WHERE" you arrive ( = a prep. phrase or its equivalent).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vulcanman

Thank you! This helps a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Glad to know it! Thank you !

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