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  5. "Plurima vestimenta sunt."

"Plurima vestimenta sunt."

Translation:There are very many clothes.

November 3, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonTeorino

"very many" does not exist in English, how do you get the right meaning of the Latin word? "multae"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldDuck

Lots of people are saying "very many" doesn't exist in English, but it isn't quite true. It might be a bit old fashioned or formal - you probably wouldn't hear it from your friends down the pub, and you might not come across it if you're learning English, but it's not wrong in English.

If duolingo will let me post a link, this is a link to Dickens using "very many", in the positive:

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Jnf9u7DbheoC&pg=PA165&lpg=PA165&dq=dickens+%22very+many%22&source=bl&ots=8XP60yA2xv&sig=ACfU3U0N1aKClxP1q5KFFYFUQcMUBDDU3g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi4jML7z8LqAhV0SEEAHRW3BXEQ6AEwC3oECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=dickens%20%22very%20many%22&f=false


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Not sure what you mean by 'very many' doesn't exist in English.

"There aren't very many..." is something I hear very often.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabriella519419

why not dresses for vestimenta?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldDuck

"Dresses" in English refers to a specific type of woman's clothing:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dress

The Latin word seems to be much more general than that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeff643814

At what point does "very many" become "a lot"? I put "There are a lot of clothes" and was counted wrong.

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