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  5. "Il bicchiere è tuo."

"Il bicchiere è tuo."

Translation:The glass is yours.

April 24, 2013

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olefattguy

Shouldn't it be " ... è IL tuo" here? Possessive article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2658

Yes, it can also be that; but when any attribute (possessive included) is alone in predicate position (the form "A is B") the article can be omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olefattguy

Thanks Formica! And thanks for a most excellent service. And software! All for free, which is mindblowing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan8202

Possessives make so much more sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_dw

So why doesn't it accept this as a correct answer? There goes my streak again...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2517

It would help if you could copy and paste your entire answer. Odds are you have an error in it somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_dw

Too late, it wasn't an answer I had to type but by selecting the right parts. So I composed with the parts available: "Il bicchiere è il tuo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2517

That should have been correct. There is a glitch with the word bank where it marks you wrong if you drag the tiles instead of just clicking/tapping them. Could that have been it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_dw

I couldn't reply on your comment anymore Rae. I don't usually drag these tiles but maybe I did. I'll find out next time. Thanks for looking into this. If I get something new, I'll post it here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nordicsea

I don't understand the difference between "The glass is yours" and "It's your glass". I would say either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Semantically they're similar but not identical, but grammatically they're quite different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I also wrote ...il tuo since it sounded as though the article was present - apparently not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irene.chris

,why tuo and not tue?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

"Il bicchiere" is masculine and singular, which "tuo" agrees with. "Tue" would be for feminine and plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

D'accordo. That makes tuo us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

b/c bicchiere is a masculine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elenalnta1

could we also say: "è il tuo bicchiere" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Both "Il bicchiere è tuo" and "È il tuo bicchiere" are both valid sentences, but they're subtly different due to their different grammatical structures. They are not perfectly interchangeable, especially in translation lessons.

"Il bicchiere è tuo" is "The glass is yours", where "the glass" is the noun phrase as the subject and "yours" is the possessive pronoun as the subject complement.

"È il tuo bicchiere" is "It is your glass", where in English there's a pronoun as the subject and in Italian the subject is implicit, and "il tuo bicchiere" is the noun phrase as the subject complement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Yes, but as written it'd be an incomplete sentence. Maybe: Questo/Quello è il tuo bicchiere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Italian (and Spanish, for that matter) allow the subject pronoun to be dropped if it's unambiguous. "È il tuo bicchiere" is not an incomplete sentence.

Also, "questo" or "quello" are specific demonstratives and cannot be substituted for "it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb829123

Grammarically correct. Just don't forget to write the subject in eglish, otherwise it is fragmental.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Rae.F. It's the lack of capitalization of "è ... that made me consider it a fragment. It struck me that a noun or demonstrative needed to precede the verb, for it to not sound incomplete. Also as pronouns, the demonstratives can stand alone as subjects: Questa è mia moglie; Questo è mio marito, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Lack of capitalization does not cause something to be a fragment. By that logic, "it is your glass" is a fragment.

Orthography and grammar are two very different things. Orthography is nothing more than the marks we make in a physical medium to symbolically convey the sounds that come out of our mouths. Grammar is the rules that emerge from the sounds we make.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

That's all true, and to support your point, I'd cite avant garde poetry that's done away with capitalization and other conventional grammatical markers. My only point was that when I first commented it was precisely that lack of capitalization that implied to me that something was perhaps missing from the question: "X è il tuo bicchiere", as in " Questo vaso è il tuo bicchiere" or even "Questo è il tuo bicchiere," using a demonstrative pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

My only point was that when I first commented it was precisely that lack of capitalization that implied to me that something was perhaps missing from the question

I understand your point. However, I believe it is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonCousino

Non capisco quando le parole sono mie invece di " le mie"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

I'm going to assume you're an English speaker asking the question in Italian.

When it's the possessive adjective (my thing, your thing, her thing, etc) you must always include the definite article, except with singular family members:
la mia gonna
le mie gonne
mio fratello
i miei fratelli

When it's the possessive pronoun (mine, yours, hers, etc), whether you include the definite article or not subtly changes the focus:

  • "La gatta è la mia" means "The CAT (and not something else) is mine."
  • "La gatta è mia" means "The cat is MINE (and not someone else's)."

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

Thanks for this explanation (although it does make it rather difficult to translate the DL English sentences into Italian when there's no indication of which emphasis is intended!).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Duo should accept either way.

Also, although I'm sure one of them is the default, I don't know which one it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan88810

Great explanation!!! Without these inputs, it's difficult to understand. The reason why I've accumulated hundreds of "words" in Italian over the years but was unable to understand or create a sentence. Grazie Mille Now I just have to spend a few days playing out those scenarios till it's embedded in my brain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasAdderley

So does "bicchiere" specifically mean a cup made of glass, like in English? Or just a cup?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2658

No, just a small cup of any material.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirstiNitz

Why not "Il bicchiere è il tuo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2517

That is also a valid translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne609994

I thought glass was feminine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2517

Only "la coppa" and "la tazza" are feminine.

il vetro, il cristallo, il bicchiere, and il calice are all masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PannPower

Surely, "it's your glass" is the same meaning and therefore correct. Don't see why this is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2517

No. "X is yours" and "It is your X" might be broadly similar, but they are not universally interchangeable. At the very least, they have different grammatical structures and Duolingo is trying to teach us both grammar and vocabulary.

Also, best practice when translating is to stay as close as possible to the source, as far as grammar and idiom allow.

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