"La policía culpa al actor."

Translation:The police blame the actor.

5 years ago

239 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/i.price
i.pricePlus
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"La policía" refers to the group "the police," not "the policeman," so in English the verb conjugates to the plural, not the singular.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjw78741

In the U.S. a group is often treated as singular, whereas in the U.K. it is treated as plural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarnes
JMBarnes
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This is correct as a general principle, but police is one of a handful of collective nouns that are almost always treated as plural even in American English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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I don't know why someone downvoted you; I agree that "police" is often (usually?) treated as plural in the US.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AviAdventure
AviAdventure
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The word police on dictionary.com states one definition for police as being any body of people officially maintained or employed to keep order, enforce regulations, etc. We wouldn't say a police stopped me. We would say an officer stopped me. More and more people are also using gender neutral words so you wouldn't hear policeman or policewoman as much either.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/police?s=t

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerHooks

It's more correct to say "the police are..." rather than "the police is..."

This is the same for bands or groups of musicians where it's technically correct to use the plural form. "Iron Maiden are..." is more correct than "Iron Maiden is"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anaraneta

Isn't the band thing just because of the name, though? Like I'd say "Green Day is..." or "Panic at the Disco is..." because the words Day and Panic are singular, while I'd say "The Kooks are..." or "The Undertones are..." because Kooks and Undertones are plural. The form I use for the band is dependent on the name and not on the fact that they're a band.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theguy07

do the police blame the actor in the movie?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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La policía culpa Juan Wilkes Booth

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/osmosiphobe

The singular form of the verb is used, so it should be translated as a singular. Otherwise, one would imagine the verb culpan would have been used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn-H
Jocelyn-H
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Actually, while "the police" is made of many people, it is still singular. It is the same for the word "family." A family is made of multiple people, but it is still considered singular. If you are referring to a bunch of people, you would use plural. If you are talking about the group, you use singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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"There are a few collective nouns (in both British and American English) that are always used with a plural verb, the most common of which are police and people: √ She's happy with the way the police have handled the case. X She's happy with the way the police has handled the case. √ It's been my experience that people are generally forgiving. X It's been my experience that people is generally forgiving. If you aren't sure whether to use a singular or a plural verb with a collective noun, look it up. Most dictionaries will tell you which is correct."

Here is the source of the above, which also gives some examples of collective nouns which are treated differently in American and British English. Hope this helps.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/words/matching-verbs-to-collective-nouns-american

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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If you want to use the singular form in English, then the noun needs to be "police officer" or something like that. I tried "police officer", and it was accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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In Spanish, it is singular. In English, it is different:

"There are a few collective nouns (in both British and American English) that are always used with a plural verb, the most common of which are police and people: √ She's happy with the way the police have handled the case. X She's happy with the way the police has handled the case. √ It's been my experience that people are generally forgiving. X It's been my experience that people is generally forgiving. If you aren't sure whether to use a singular or a plural verb with a collective noun, look it up. Most dictionaries will tell you which is correct."

Here is the source of the above quote, which also gives some examples of collective nouns which are treated differently in American and British English. Hope this helps.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/words/matching-verbs-to-collective-nouns-american

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Osmosiphobe, you need to read i.price's comment, above.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/osmosiphobe

I did. This is a response to that comment...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

well I know for starters that British English is always right in a argument as the Americans got the language off us when we invaded

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peppersqueaks

Languages evolve, do you honestly think the English that was spoken during the 16th century was anything like either modern day dialect? I wouldn't be surprised if you did, seeing as how you think American settlers somehow adopted the language. What did you think the British were speaking on the way to Jamestown, Virginia? Did you not stay awake long enough in history class to learn that the settlers came from Britain, and would by extension speak the same English as any other British of that era? A version of English that is nothing like its modern day counterpart, might I add, as they both evolved separately for hundreds of years due to the distance between the countries. American English is just as different from colonial English as British English is. There is so much ignorance and facepalm in your comment that it's downright cringeworthy. Lol, but keep telling yourself the Americans "got the language off" Brits if you're that desperate to fabricate reasons to tell yourself you're superior to us. Fool.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeGOgletree
LeeGOgletree
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My gosh, that was harsh.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

yep I know that which also brings up another one of my points instead of declaring independence from your own people you should work together ( both Britain and america) to make things equal but the work can never have that happen

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CASSANDRAM436337

Dude. Don't bring that up. That's how people think that your some type of historical racist know-it-all. Just don't. For your sake.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

'ALMOST always'. I am from Canada and I am telling you that I always blame the police not the actors.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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What does that have to do with treating the word as singular or plural?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

how have people marked you down this was a valid comment

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

well that's your opinion and we don't hear it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peppersqueaks

Get off the internet and go see a shrink. Nobody wants to hear your self pity unless they're getting paid for it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CASSANDRAM436337

Who's we? Last time i checked that name had 1 person's name not 2.We didn't exactly ask for your opinion on " Where English came from" so your mouth has some pretty dumb opinions itself ,so don't come here talking about opinions and keeping them to our self's if you can't do the same for your self. Dumb false facts like that with a lack effert of evadince can get you into a unwanted place like this. Another thing is that telling random people that can make some delooned psyco so mad that they would want nothing more than to hurt you ,as well. putting stuff like this can also hurt not just others but you. Now i guess I've done that with you, haven't i? My point exact.

Good day, sir. Good day!:3

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

well anyone can hurt me because my life is worthless and this wouldn't hurt me because its true and I'm not saying that the British empire was right ( because we were a bunch of ass holes) and the we I can assume meant Britain as it has ben more than 3 months since I posted this comment ( had no idea it even existed) and how would that hurt me as its the truth its hurt those who perceive it and don't talk to me about psyco as you know jack all about them and about what they can do I know what the can do and how they get treated this is all someone my family has gone thorugh

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘La policía’ can also mean “the policewoman”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inhumanbookworm
inhumanbookworm
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Can police refer to the institution? Is it still plural then?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the discussion started by Rainbowwoman.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It is always plural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tecunumanjohn

nah, policia is a collective noun....singular: you're right A (1) group.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ves_McVoid
Ves_McVoid
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I wrote "the policeman", only for it to tell me i was wrong and that "the policewoman" was correct.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'The policeman' would be 'el policia'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnChildr2

"La policia" is one officer. The plural would be "las policias".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

Nop, "la policía" refers to the institution, "the police". "Las policías" would be something femenine polices.

One officer is "el policía".

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LourdesJoc

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boseous

The police can be conjugated to the singular or plural. Singular sounds better imo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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What is sounds like, is irrelevant. Is your first language English. The word 'police' always uses a plural verb.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1123902889

-_- really no

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puppalicious

In American English, we would say either "the police officer blames" or "the police blame" I've never heard anyone say "the police blames".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WillRossma1

We might say "the police department blames" though.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanaBau
SanaBau
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"The police officer blames the actor" should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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The gender-neutral “the police officer” would be ‘el policía’. However, ‘la policía’ can also mean “the policewoman”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

I used "policewoman" and it was not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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It is now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RatInAMaze

Agreed. One meaning of "policía" is "police officer", even in the mouse-over tip that this site itself gives.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

Not if you are the actor!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Does "culpa" need "a" as a preposition or is this a personal a?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bcwarne

yes, culpar requires the preposition, regardless of personal a. culpar a = to blame on, culpar de = to blame for.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackherbach12

Could you please expound on this? I really don't understand how these two would be used practically. I would very much appreciate it, comrade ;).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘La policía culpa del accidente a la lluvia.’ = “The police blame the accident on the rain.”.

‘La policía culpa a la lluvía del accidente.’ = “The police blame the rain for the accident.”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Thank you!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Both: Yes, the verb always takes the preposition ‘a’ for the thing being blamed as the cause; and yes, it's the accusative ‘a’, sometimes misleadingly called the “personal ‘a’”.

Since the object being blamed takes the ‘a’ preposition even if it's an evidently inanimate object such as a lamp or the rain, it would seem that the ‘a’ is marking an indirect object rather than a specific animate direct object. However, clitic doubling proves that the object being blamed is a direct object: One says ‘la culpan a ella’ = “They're blaming her”, not (except in leísmo dialects) *‘le culpan a ella’, where ‘la’ agrees with a direct object, while ‘le’ would agree with an indirect object. In other words, the ‘a’ is definitely the accusative preposition marking a specific animate direct object, not the dative preposition marking an indirect object. So why is there an ‘a’ when the object being blamed, even if it's specific and direct, is as inanimate as a lamp or the rain? Presumably, an object can be blamed for an outcome only if the object could be responsible for that outcome, and only if the object could cause the outcome; and responsibility and agency are indisputably characteristics of animacy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MASiemer

I'm suprised no one is talking about the fact that "actor" had a mouse over that said "plaintiff" which I thought made more sense, so I wrote that. Then they marked it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ikagudo

Simply as a learning tool, the mouse-over should list only appropriate synonyms for the sentence given. It doesn't matter if "plaintiff" is another use for " actor" if "plaintiff" is not a correct choice. That muddies the lesson. Now we know that Spanish for "plaintiff" is "actor" but have no idea when it's appropriate to use it in a sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

It is my intuition (and I could be completely wrong) that duoLingo programming uses this device as a way to teach you not to use a word that you have previously used incorrectly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan176028

Saying the police blamed the plaintiff would be redundant. The actor would only become the plaintiff once they have been brought before a judge.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Although plaintiffs bring suit in civil and criminal actions, police are more concerned about criminal actions, given that the state is the plaintiff in criminal cases. Accordingly, use of the word "plaintiff" doesn't even make any sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JudiPollock

Don't police blame the state lawyers all the time in situations on, "Law and Order," for example?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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the state lawyers ≠ the state

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raul224114

I beg to differ. State lawyers = the state. On television, "state lawyers" represent the government. In real life, in court sessions, such lawyers are referred to as "the government." Why? Because, in fact, these agents perform on behalf of the state. Like those other state actors, the police and judges, state lawyers embody the state.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Actually, then they would become the defendant, not the plaintiff.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chazaloe

couldn't 'culpa' mean 'fault' as in 'the police fault the actor'. this is something i hear in English all the time. Or is there a better way to translate that English sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melissambwilkins

This is what I thought, as well, and my answer was marked wrong. It is the more literal translation, and it is correct in English, though I suppose it IS more common to hear someone say "blame." It's hard for people to think of all possible correct translations when programming, I guess, because I put forth correct translations that are shot down all the time in this program (I check with native speakers when I'm unsure).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan176028

British English may use fault. In US it would be accuse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

I am a U. S citizen, and I hear the word "fault" used this way frequently. "Can't fault me for that!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Musicislifebug

A good way to remember "culpa" is to think of blaming a culprit. That at least helps me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xhmko

Or to think of who is culpable...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jestings

Yep, 'culpa' comes directly from the latin for blame, guilt, or fault. So words like culprit, culpable, and the spanish culpa are simply latin derivatives of the word. Learning some latin roots is helpful for all the romance languages, like french, italian, and spanish- Especially since there are tons of english derivatives.

Ex. Latin: Amo, amare, amor (love)
English: Amorous (relating to sexual desire)
Spanish: Amor, amar (love, passion)
French: Aimer, Amour (love)
Italian: Amare, amore (love)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaguVinaya

They say he acted alone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E128k

If only horrible acting were a crime

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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Hey, actors can be criminals. And many do get arrested for doing crazy stuff. Just look through any issue of people mag and you'll read about some celebrity wrecking his or her life. Ever wonder why they do that so often?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toggitang
toggitang
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You both are right. Horrible acting is quite awful (if you paid money and time to watch, that is) and JewishPolyglot you are right they do ruin themselves quite often, poor people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewOSh6

Culpa's english equivalent is inculpate.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smontoya
smontoya
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Peccavo is correct; la policía requires a plural verb in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sachabaptista

Please, can someone explain "a el actor" vs "al actor" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarnes
JMBarnes
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“Al” is just a contraction of “a el”. Anytime you would write “a el” in Spanish, you must contract it to “al” instead. (However, note that “a él”, meaning “to him”, does not contract; “el” and “él” are different words.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sachabaptista

Oh ok, thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeltopp

Why do you give plaintiff as a choice and then reject it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

See my reply above.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayDub1984

Sting was good in the group police!! Lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

only in latin america can the police blame the actor for staging a murder jajaja

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahav862043

"Al actor" is a shortcut for "a el actor". Isn't it?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

Yes.... it's an obligatory contraction.

Greetings.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rainbowwoman

the police is both is both plural and singular - so both can be chosen

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

"Police" is a word that always takes a third person plural verb, whether it is being used as a collective noun (singular in form but plural in meaning) or a singular noun (singular in form and also referring to many policemen as a singular set). An example of "police" used as a collective noun: "Police are busy during the weekends because many people have more time to get in trouble." In this sentence, many police everywhere are doing things that policemen do with other people. An example of "police" used with a possible singular meaning: "The police knocked on my door in order to tell me to evacuate because of rising floodwater." In this sentence, it is possible that only one policeman was knocking. North American English speakers use this construction because that individual is a member of a class that is being referred to in a generic way. A better example of a plural meaning with a singular form is when English speakers say "Mathematics is one of my favorite subjects." This is another collective meaning in which the plural form of the noun is viewed as a set with a singular meaning. Because this plural form has a singular meaning, the word takes a singular third person verb.

If this is still confusing, compare this with "History is one of my favorite subjects" or with "Gymnastics is not my favorite subject." In all of these examples, the subject noun of the sentence takes a singular verb because the subject is singular in meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Right now, Google gives me 689,000 hits for “The police is working” and 1,380,000 for “The police are working”, and similar ratios for other singular versus plural verb agreement. The context of the top several hits in each case reveals that the singular almost always refers to the institution, not to an individual police officer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

I did a little research and discovered that "police" is a unique noun. United States English ALWAYS treats "police" as a collective plural noun. British English treats "police" as both singular and plural. I gave the United States explanation above. I didn't give an example of a verb other than "is." In United States English, "The police blame …" is again third person plural. For more information about U.S. usage, see:

http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/101751-A-Unique-Collective-and-Uncountable-Noun-Police

http://www.languageusage.com/q/answers-collective-noun-police-singular-or-plural-79654.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English#Formal_and_notional_agreement

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Aha, so living in England has corrupted my American English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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No it hasn't corrupted your American English. 'Police' always uses a plural verb in the UK as well. Anyone using a singular verb is not using correct English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

!Cada loco, su tema! ;^)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PablitoNogales

In American English, saying, the police knocked on my door implies that were multiple cops on your doorstep. One would say, a policeman, to indicate one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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This is a good full explanation Linda but i think one of your examples is false. You use "the police knocked...." As example of a singular verb but in fact this exemplifies nothing as it ducks the issue! Say instead " the police WERE knocking...." Yes? You wouldn't use "was" would you? The single officer is a red herring, the institution is - plurally - knocking. But you are right, it is the only example that comes readily to mind of a singular noun with which a plural verb seems correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff.suter

Since the verb "culpa"(el,ella,usted) is used aren't we given to know that La policia in this particular sentence is a singular person?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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The way I understand it, it's considered a "single" institution. In German at least, "die Polizei" means the institution and gets a 3rd person singular verb as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff.suter

Right. I understand the phrase "The police" to mean all those people who earn a living working as police officers. I am asking about the use of the verb in this particular sentence. Ok. Simply so I can learn Spanish better if the sentence is " Las Policia culpan al actor.". Would this be the proper way to express "The police" as in the social institution simply due to the fact that the ellos/ellas/ustedes(they) form of the verb is being used in the sentence. The reason I ask is only because when one hovers the pointing device/mouse over the word 'policia' and the drop-down box code is executed three words: 1.) Police 2.)Police office 3.)Policeman are displayed. At this point I logically analyze this to mean that any one of the three words could be a possible translation based on context or verb use. If that is not how this program is structured then the educational value of the words that show in the drop-down box becomes nil or is significantly degraded and would certainly need to be re-structured for higher educational effectiveness.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan176028

See LindaHill above. In American English no single police officer would accuse.He/she would be acting on behalf of the entire force.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Thank you, dotool. Again, that is correct syntax in a Spanish sentence, but not in an English one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynnecover

But why the personal "a" - a plus el - al, actor is certainly not personal.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/i.price
i.pricePlus
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To my understanding the "personal" a is not so personal. It simply refers to the object being a person (or pet) rather than a thing. For example, you use it for "the actor" since that's a person-- but not with "the lamp" since that's a thing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bcwarne

i believe in this case, with culpar, the personal a is not relevant. culpar requires the preposition, regardless of personal a. culpar a = to blame on, culpar de = to blame for. culpar la lámpara is not correct .... culpar a la lámpara is correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘culpar’ does indeed require the preposition ‘a’, and ‘culpar a la lámpara’ is indeed correct; however, it is the accusative ‘a’, not the dative ‘a’. See the discussion under sakasiru's question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

lynnecover- actor is a person, it's an animated noun, it needs the personal A.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darynholdswoth.

Isn't "culpa" 3rd person singular?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Yes, it is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poppyizzie1

anyone else getting slightly disheartened by this section?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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It's not surprising

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vashishvip

"accuses" is wrong. Why ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xhmko

What would be a translation for cop?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘poli’

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GreenWolfGo

why isn't "the police blame it on the actor" correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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There's no “it” in the Spanish original. That would be «La policía culpa al actor de ello.».

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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In Spanish does "actor" always mean someone who works on stage/screen or can it also just mean someone who does something, as in performs an act?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dogy89

Why " The Police blames on the actor" is invalid? it says "al" is "a+ el" which means on the or to the.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sitotato1847

True, I would like an answer to that question!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You can't translate literally on most occasions from one language to another. In this case, you can't translate 'al actor' totally literally. The 'a' here is what is called the 'personal a', because it is used when the object of the sentence is a person, or perhaps a pet. So you just have to omit it in English. 'The police blame (not blames) the actor.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sue91707
sue91707
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why is it not culpan ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'La policía' is a singular word so it requires a singular verb, unlike in English, where we use a plural verb.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juan993342

I've scrolled the page a bit searching for an answer. Would the word "culpa" be more likely used for "blame" or to "charge" someone of breaking a law? Would that term be used in either sense?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmorgan456

Why not "The police are blaming the actor"? This was rejected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Are blaming' is a continuous tense, whereas 'culpa' is the simple present tense, 'blame'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobJoe353653

I do not understand that when I clicked on the la policia it did not say the, for some reason

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VickyFerbert

Why can't "actor" be translated "plaintiff" in this sentence? Plaintiff was the alternate meaning, and certainly makes sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peppersqueaks

Great point, you should report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Somebody marked an awful lot of comments with negative votes, which I think is inappropriate, so I upvoted them to cancel them out. Negative votes should be used sparingly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NurseBear11

Question: If police is to be treated as plural, then why is "policewomAn" an acceptable translation?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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If you translate 'La policía' as 'the police', then it will require a plural verb in English; if you translate if as 'the policewoman', then it will require a singular verb.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eunjooLee5
eunjooLee5
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is "la policia" both plural and singular?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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In Spanish, 'la policía' is singular, because it is a singular word. In English we use the plural with 'the police'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spellings_22929
spellings_22929
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why al ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

Because "to blame" is "culpar a". So "blame the..." would be "culpar a el...". However, in Spanish "a el" or "de el" are wrong. They are obligatory contractions "al" and "del".

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

Blames

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb492139

So, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sassy113

Why is it 'al' and not 'las'?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Las' does indeed mean 'the', but it is feminine plural, so would not apply to 'the actor', 'el actor', which is masculine singular. 'Al' is formed by contracting a + el and usually means 'to the', but here the 'a' is what is called the 'personal a', because an actor is a person. It must be included, but is not translated into English.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipFra3

It be like that sometimes

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'It is like that sometimes.'

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donny57

Why al and not la

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Al' = a + el. The 'a' is added because an actor is a person. It is called the 'personal a'. 'Actor' is a masculine word, so it's 'el actor', not 'la actor'.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c.g.silver
c.g.silver
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Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dospescados
dospescados
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how do you say policeman?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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El policía.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScratchSlash

Yep, they new it was him especially since he was playing a criminal and he didn't have an alibi.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mischka361610

I guess blame and blames are both correct, aren't they?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Although the endings on English present tense verbs are easier than Spanish ones, you still need to take care. I/you/we they blame; he/she/it blames. So no, they are not both correct.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua214481

Why would it not be "las" policía?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Policia' is a singular word, so it has to be 'la' policia. You have to think of the grammar of a particular word rather than the concept of 'police' being a number of people.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fcoolbeans

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deepika217849

The police blames the actor is showing as incorrect

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Police' is considered to be plural in English so take a plural verb: 'blame'.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CandySpani1

police blames is better grammer

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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No, it's not better grammar (note spelling!). In English the word 'police' is considered a plural word so uses a plural verb. 'The police blame the actor'.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarshAgarw2

Why it cannot be the police blames the actor or blamed the actor

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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If you read my many comments in this forum you'll discover the answer to your question!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/av223119

Congrats. Instead of teaching Spanish, you pick nits. Many of the learners are not native English speakers, so insisting on some peculiarities of one English dialect is counter-productive.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaSSavel

Why does the drop down meaning indicate actor and plaintiff as would be in a court situation not acceptable in this instance?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pawan_chand
pawan_chand
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why are we using 'al'?can't we just say la policia culpa el actor?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DawnForman1

why is it al actor and not el actor

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WesleyPrates
WesleyPrates
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I dont get this 'al actor'. Shouldnt it be 'el actor'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MakenzieTroedson

Why, in some sentences, do we use the word "al," but not in others. I have always known "al" as a combination of "to" (a) and "the" (el). Lemme know, por favor.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

I would say "blames"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You use 'blame', which is the plural verb, in English, because you consider that the police consists of a number of people, rather than just being a singular word grammatically. So it is 'they' blame the actor.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olivia-R-W
Olivia-R-W
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What is the purpose of 'al' or 'a' after a verb?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mymomrox

For what, Acting?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterB44
PeterB44
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Why al actor -not el or la ?..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

It' s already explained. Just read.

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan349172

Oops duolingo! Police is a collective noun. Should translate as 'The police blame the actor'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnHasson
FinnHasson
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Could "actor" in this sense have the same connotation as in English, meaning one who took part in a crime? Or does it refer strictly to the profession of acting?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Redblob48

Popo. Srsly, duo, do you not know how to put good words together? The policeman blames the actor. ??? Is my reel name i mean real name. So... Who wants pancakes?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Winston_III

why is it "al actor" instead of el actor? is this a contextual thing?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Read the many other comments on this subject in this forum. You will find the answer to your question!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hadimu

Why cant you translate "accuses"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isabelaida1

Why is it not: La policía culpan al actor"? It is the police that blames the actor, so should it not be "they blame"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Isabel, culpamos = we blame; culpan = they blame; culpa = he/she blames.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isabelaida1

I meant "culpan", I typed without thinking. So why is it culpa? When it is the police that blames the actor and not the other way around?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

The direct object will have a personal a before it - al actor. The other noun is the subject. This sentence is in the regular wordorder. Read all the above comments above, it will certainly help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

In English, the word "police" is always a collective noun (plural in meaning but singular in form) that requires a singular verb. Whenever a noun is singular in form, it requires a singular verb. In fact, some nouns that are plural in form but can have a singular meaning, such as the word "mathematics," sometimes require a singular verb when the meaning is singular. For example, consider the sentence, "Mathematics is my favorite subject." In this case, the sentence is about one specific field of study. Consequently, the verb is singular.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevegaley

duolingo has marked my answer "The police officer blames the actor" as wrong. Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the reply to SanaBau.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

It should not be marked wrong. I would report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinJacob4

I heard al doctor, even in turtle mode

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllenSierra

Why not: la policia culpa EL actor. ???? Why is it al?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the replies to sakasiru's question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllenSierra

Why not: La policia culpa EL actor?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Questen
Questen
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"The Great Thespian Caper"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryguytheflyguy1

Mel Gibson?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/logane616

...for a murder. To the gallows with you! (I wanted to use chair but that might be rude)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zajdel

When should I use al instead of el or la?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You have to add 'a' in Spanish, which is not translated, when the object of the sentence is a person or a pet. This is called the 'personal a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cade_Manuel

I don't get how my sentence "The police scolds the actor." is wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Culpar' = to blame. 'The police' uses a plural verb in English 'blame'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cookie365107

' Culpa al actor' I translate as ' blame TO the actor' instead of 'blame THE actor'. Which is correct, Please ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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It's that curious "personal A" rule, Cookie.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/williammiller1

typical always blame the actor -_-

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wingo87

luv your profile picture, i'm a star wars fan!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gopinat

why is it "al actor" and not "el actor"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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The 'al' includes the personal 'a', because an actor is a person. This doesn't translate into English.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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Why is "The police blames on the actor" wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevegaley

British English does not consider the verb to blame a transitive verb. It does not require a particle, and does not form a phrasal verb, which is what "blame on" is. The British English version is correctly "The police blame the actor". If you said "The police place blame on the actor" that would be correct British English, but then place is used as a phrasal verb "place on", with "on" as the particle. But the sense of the Spanish sentence is not quite retained, and the correct British English translation is the simple "The police blame the actor".

I have no idea what the grammatical rules are for American English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peppersqueaks

It's the same for American English. Not to be rude or anything, but I think people should have a good grasp of English before attempting to learn another language using English.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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stevegaley - The verb 'to blame' is indeed a transitive verb as it requires an object, which here is 'the actor'. Clearly the verb does not require a preposition in English, which is why 'blames on' is incorrect.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinWilt

Don't blame the actor blame the Russians

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishgeek2000

alguien me da una palanquillas por favor

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielrentel

If it weren't for Tom Cruz, we wouldn't have shot him.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BendytheInkDemon

I could write a story on this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaJa11190

Sí senor

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keelianna

Poor actor, he was just doing his job.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kai7

Why would this be 'al actor', and not just 'el actor'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the replies to sakasiru's question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cassidymottola

being an actor myself, i do not approve of this sentence. It is rude and hurtful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MastaBlast6

gay

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johannes263688

It's is just inconceivable for stupid people that police can be singular, so English must be adopted to sound stupid.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peppersqueaks

You must be adopted and definitely sound very stupid.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nobleshade

In English it is more natural to use blames instead of blame as used in this sentance

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

It is only natural to use the predicate verb "blames" when the subject is "policeman" or "policewoman."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hploviedovie

Why wouldn't it be blame it on the actor?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lonewolf969

Don't get al <-

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the replies to sachabaptista and sakasiru.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindastagnolia

in this sentence i do not understand the use of "el" and "al" please explain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the replies to sachabaptista and sakasiru.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CgraceR

English translation is wrong " the police blame" it would be the "policeman blames"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

This usage is acceptable because "police" is a collective noun. "Blame" is third person plural and thus is the right number (plural) for an "uncountable" noun, given that, by definition, something uncountable must be more than one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Uncountable nouns are always used in singular:

The water is cold. There is a lot of sand.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoahBlevins

This is true in the U.S with minor exceptions. "Police" just so happens to be one of them. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/matching-verbs-to-collective-nouns The Oxford Dictionary talks about this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Len_H
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it may be localized, where I live " the police blame" works.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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And just about everywhere in the English-speaking world.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

I am taking SPANISH lessons here not English. THE POLICE BLAMES THE ACTOR if that is not right, then 99.99999999% of the English speaking world is wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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No, that percentage is how wrong you are. Linda Hill has explained this well!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

I am taking SPANISH lessons here not English. THE POLICE BLAMES THE ACTOR if that is not right, then 99.99999999% of the English speaking world is wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoahBlevins

The word "police" is being used to describe the police as a whole. Saying just one would be "the police officer", "the policeman", or "the policewoman". The conjugation of "to blame" must agree with the number of police officers. "Blames" is the third person singular conjugation, while "blame" is the third person plural conjugation. In either case, you are wrong, simply for causing the subject and the verb not to agree.

1 year ago
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