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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitriCris

DuoLinguo lessons with macrons. INTRO

First of all I'd like to thank the Contributirs. The Latin course is really amazing. I always wanted to Learn latin and Doulinguo helped me do that. I know that it had to be easy. But I'd like to pronounce stuff like you guys do, and understand the phonology nuances. So I lokked up in Wiktionary and also Cactus2000 to put macrons where they should be. My humble try with the INTRO section:

Introduction

Salvēte

Personal Pronouns Example: Ego vir sum. = Vir sum

Latin English ego/egō I

tū you (sg) is, ea* he, she nōs we

vōs you (pl) iī, eae* they

*Forms of the demonstrative pronoun is, ea, id

To Be In this skill you will learn the singular forms of the verb to be (esse, sum). Latin English sum I am es you are est he, she, it is

Mārcus, Līvia, Corinna, Stephanus

New Vocabulary

Latin English Additional Info (Declension, gender, etc.)

fēmina woman 1st, fem.

vir man 2nd, masc.

puer boy 2nd, masc.

puella girl 1st, fem.

pater father 3rd, masc.

māter mother 3rd, fem.

soror sister 3rd, fem.

frāter brother 3rd, masc.

nōn not

et and

sed but

quis who?

dormit he, she sleeps

studet he, she studies

scrībit he, she writes

in urbe in the city

domī at home

November 6, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitriCris

Probably I should post that in wiki lessons or smth. Please give as much feedback as you can. Thanks in advance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManateeLamprey

Thanks! I'm not a contributor, but I think this could be a helpful addition. As you may well already know, macrons were not generally included in Latin prose; they certainly influence pronunciation but were valued more as an indicator of length, leading to their more prominent use in meter-based poetry. However, many textbooks and such will use them when teaching as it makes pronunciation easier. Thanks again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You list the word for "brother," but you don't include its long a (frāter--best I can do). To complicate things a bit: a word like soror doesn't have a long o in the nomin. sing., but in all other forms, it does: sorōrēs, nom. pl., sorōrem, accus. sing., and so forth.

(EDIT: I have since learned to type the long marks on my Mac, so I've fixed it.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitriCris

Thank you very much.

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