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"banana or pineapple"

Translation:ka maiʻa a i ʻole ka hala kahiki

November 6, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VirginiaKa432612

you didn't put down the banana and the pineapple so why should I put "the" before each fruit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laamaikahi

okay, so, the first sentence I got was, "banana or pineapple" and the translation was, "maiʻa a i ʻole hala kahiki". Now, the answer is, "ka maiʻa a i ʻole ka hala kahiki"? there is no ʻtheʻ in the english, so why is there ʻkaʻ in the translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apela5

That is exactly what the answer quoted????????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

"Ka" in Hawaiian is not truly equivalent to "the". It is very common for it to be used before "noun"-type words though, even if there might be no use of "the" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talmerian

Why is there a 'the' in the Hawaiian translation but not in the English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jt_air

I see ai ʻole used more often than a i ʻole. Is that one of those regional things?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat47069

Doesn't 'ole mean "no"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Pololei ʻoe. You're right, ʻole does have a sense of "no" or "not". One way to think about the phrase "a i ʻole" is "and if not".

"ka maiʻa a i ʻole ka hala kahiki" could be read like "the banana, and if not, the pineapple", which is somewhat similar to "the banana or the pineapple"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat47069

Makes sense. Mahalo.

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