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"Pero me habré decidido esta semana."

Translation:But I will have decided this week.

1
5 years ago

89 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RamseyLinguist

What is the difference between "me habré decidido esta semana" and "yo habré decidido esta semana"?

102
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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Good question, I was kinda wondering about the same thing. I find in the dictionary that

  • decidir = to decide
  • decidirse = to make up one's mind.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/decidir

One difference I can hypothesize is that the word "decidir" can take a direct object, while "decidirse" cannot.

So in this case we have no direct object, so we can put in the word "me". Then you can translate it with: "this week I will have made up my mind". However, if the phrase specifies what you have decided on (a direct object), then you can't put "me". So it would be: "Yo habré decidido eso" or "yo habré decidido ir a la escuela".

This is all speculation though.

216
Reply185 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogduo
rogduo
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Very good speculation. Note that the ¨Yo¨ part is really a red-herring. I.e, the difference is not in starting with YO, vs starting with ME, but rather using ME, or not using ME. Either version could have added or omitted the YO, without changing the meaning.

94
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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'Yo' is the easy part. We should all know by now (by this point in the tree) that 'yo' is optional.

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonD108

Or, "Yo lo habre decidido."

-8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No. This would be "I will have decided IT".

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

I believe the reflecive for decidirse is the pronomial form. You use . It if you have an indirect object introduced by a pronoun like "a" or "por" or "de."

"decidirse a hacer algo" to decide to do something

"si te decides a venir, llámame" if you decide to come, give me a ring

"decidirse por"  to decide on, to choose

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

I think me habré is because it is reflexive, literally, I will have decided for myself.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No. "decidir" is not a reflexive verb but a pronominal one. In this case, "me" changes the meaning of "decidir". To show that someone decides for himself, you say "Yo mismo decido".

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbronso
dbronso
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I'm having trouble with this... so why use "me" in the sentence if not to indicate that I decided myself. Veo is a prenominal verb. If I say "me veo" - doesn't it mean I see myself and if I say "veo la coche" it means I see the car. or if I say "Me escribo una nota" - I write myself a note. or "Escribo una nota" It just means I write a note. So reflexive is a context of prenominal verbs. Can someone explain a little deeper please? Thanks!
(my response below was posted previous to this...)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Unfortunately, you can use "ver", "escribir", and "decidir" as transitive, intransitive or pronominal verbs. Some meanings are valid in each case.

In a pronominal verb, the pronoun must always agree with the subject. For example, the verb "ver" in "me veo" does not work as a pronominal verb as "te veo" is valid. The same with "escribir" in "me escribo" ("te escribo").

What happens with "decidir" in "me habré decidido"? "te habré decidido" is wrong (to be sure, write it in Google). In this case, "decidir" works as a pronominal verb.

2
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbronso
dbronso
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Thank you... that did help.... But it brings me back to the point of thinking that while "Habré decidido esta semana." would be correct, if you say "Me habré decicido esta semana.", it would put emphasis on the fact that I, myself, will be making the decision! Or does it possibly have something to do with the word Pero starting the sentence that requires the pronoun Me?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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"Me" does not put emphasis (http://dle.rae.es/?w=me&m=form&o=h); "mismo" does (http://dle.rae.es/?w=mismo&m=form&o=h).

The verb "decidir" is pronominal as you can see in the definition of the RAE. So you have to use a pronoun. "6. prnl. Hacer una elección tras reflexionar sobre ella. Al final se decidieron por la casa más cara" (RAE).

4
12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I need more information because I can't tell if your explanation means that pronomial verbs are reflexive verbs. It would help if anyone could give three example of Spanish sentences–along with their translation into English–in which one verb is used as a transitive verb, an intransitive verb, and a pronominal verb. Thank you in advance, and three lingots for the best explanation!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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I almost sure that a pronominal verb in Spanish is the same as a reflexible verb in English.

An example of a spanish verb used as:

Intransitivo: Yo juego. (Intransitive: I play.)

Transitivo: Yo juego ajedrez. (Transitive: I play chess.) Pronominal: Yo me juego la vida. (Transitive: I risk my life. I stake my life)

0
41 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Adelphine, since this post of yours, others have added to this forum. Reading these additional comments, I agree with you that pronouns associated with Spanish pronomial verbs work the same way that English reflexive pronouns work with English nouns.

What is different is the way that Spanish and English consider the grammar of the situation. Spanish grammar analyzes the pronoun in terms of how it relates to the predicate verb. English grammar analyzes the pronoun in terms of how it relates to the subject noun. Perhaps that is why the pronouns of Spanish pronomial verbs are not always translated into English pronouns ending in "-self." In the same vein, I have the impression that Spanish pronomial pronouns may not always lend the same amount of emphasis to the verb that English reflexive pronouns (which, for the purposes of this conjectory comment, are defined as equivalents) do.

Another point of comparison is that the pronouns used with pronomial verbs are defined as changing said verbs' meaning in that same way that English articles (defined as prepositions that follow English verbs and alter those verbs' meanings; for example, "give in," "give up," "give out," etc.) emphasize nouns.

0
10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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In general, I agree. However, I think the pronoun, in pronominal verbs, does not add emphasis. In fact, I could not find an example in which the pronoun adds emphasis. However, I found phrases in which the verbs seem pronominal ones but they are not. For example, in the phrases "me sé la materia" or "se sabe la lección", the pronouns are pleonastic (note that "saber" is not a pronominal verb).

0
10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I also think "But I will have decided for myself this week" should be accepted

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriQuaid
LoriQuaid
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I answered that, and I was marked wrong

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbronso
dbronso
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It is reflexive context though.... so I also put "I will have decided myself...." only to be marked wrong as well. Saying it like this would mean to me that I made the decision by or for myself... I agree that it should be accepted.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vaporfano
vaporfano
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I'm a native Spanish speaker, and I've never heard of the "me habré decidido" form. We use a reflexive form, yes, but never in the first person singular, it's more for questions, like ¿Ya te decidiste? We usually use "Para entonces, ya habré decidido/pensado/resuelto [+esto] ..." That sentence is just weird....

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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I am also a native Spanish speaker, and I think that "me habré decidido" is valid. You can even read this wording in some books.

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.Christian.
.Christian.
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Yes, Adelpine, but for me that I'm not a native Spanish speaker, It sounds unnatural, and sure can be valid but we're particularly not learning sentences or phrases which are used in books, I think so that I need known things not poetics or things like that, therefore although you're right to say that is valid because It's it, a possible answer could be: -Me decidiré esta semana, time is different but is more known or used for me since I'm living in Colombia and I've never listened to this over here, I hope you don't misinterpret my message I only gave my point of view.

Greetings and luck :-)

Bye

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Vaporfano did not put on doubt the use of the future perfect. It has a small use but it has always been so. We need this tense to say things like "I will have bought the tickets when you arrive to the stadium". If you use the future tense, the meaning is different both in English and Spanish.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_LittleBatman_

Yeah! I agree. It sounds terrible in Spanish. El "Me" es redundante, no tiene lugar en la oración o expresión.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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The RAE says "decidir... 1. tr. Cortar... 2. tr. resolver (‖ tomar determinación de algo). U. t. c. prnl. 3. tr. Mover..."

The academy accepts the usage of "decidir" either as transitive or pronominal. In this phrase, there is no object for "decidir" so you have to add a pronoun to use it as pronominal.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Native English speaker weighing in here, and perhaps "me habré decidido" is the literal translation of an English tense that is used often by native English speakers. So, just as we students of Spanish have to accustom ourselves to Spanish the way it is spoken by native Spanish speakers, perhaps the DL program is taking an English tense and trying to find its closest analogue in the Spanish language. Comments anyone?

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryMacki1

While it is often done, it is just plain wrong in English to start a sentence with 'but'. Collage English teachers will seriously reduce one's grade for that.

-3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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"Don't Begin Sentences with But" Is a Writing Myth. See http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/457

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryMacki1

That may be, it makes sense, but none the less it is likely to get one a lot of red ink on school papers. So I suppose it depends on if one is in school and wants a good grade, or not.

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It's a matter of style, and I agree with you, TerryMascki1, that the best English writers don't use "but to introduce a sentence. However, Spanish isn't English, and thus, it is perfectly acceptable. The issue, here, as I see it, is that we are trying to learn to translate accurately. Thus, I think style takes a backseat to translation when one is perfecting one's ability to interpret.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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But I will have made a decision this week did not work 12/24/13. I'm reporting it.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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It is really close in meaning but

"But I will have made a decision this week" = "Pero habré tomado una decisión esta semana."

as opposed to

"Pero me habré decidido esta semana." = "I will have made up my mind this week."

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

As a native English speaker, I would translate "Pero me habré decidido esta semana" as "But I will have decided for myself this week," which is understood as "I will have decided for myself (by the end of) this week." This word-for-word translation is correct, so why do you prefer the colloquial "will have made up my mind?" Is it because of the reflexive "myself?"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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I think it should be accepted - I reported it again

-1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/generalmola

I put "But I will have decided for myself this week" and was marked wrong. Any thoughts why? I realize that the "for myself" is redundant, but it can be used for emphasis. This is the case in English.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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That is a good reason to reject your answer. If you add "myself" to the English sentence, you have to add "mismo" to the Spanish one and vice versa.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/200709709
200709709
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why not "but i will have settled this week"? duolingo suggests it -.,-

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

Is the "me" for emphasis?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No. In this phrase, "decidir" is a pronominal verb.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drominet

will = shall ( 1st personn singular and plural !!!)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoulderSpanish

How would you say "I myself will have decided this week?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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I would say "Yo mismo habré decidido esta semana" (decide means to settle something in dispute or doubt) or "Yo mismo me habré decidido esta semana" (decide means to determine a preference).

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatsyAnn27

I hope that this won't confuse the issue more. I was careful to give my answer as, "But I will have decided this week." because I have learned that Duolingo does not appreciate words added or dropped. However, it helped me to account for the "me" by thinking of the meaning as, "I will have reached a decision this week." Otherwise, the sentence seems to be incomplete, with the unspoken question of, "Decided what?"

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It depends on context. There are many questions that could be answered by "However, I will have decided this week." Many people substitute "but" for "however," "nevertheless," and/or "nonetheless." However, in formal writing it is de rigueur not to use "but."

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No, it is accepted in formal writing. See http://grammarist.com/grammar/conjunctions-to-start-sentences/

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"De rigueur" means stylish. I agree with you that starting a sentence with a coordinating conjunction is acceptable.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estudiantenoe
estudiantenoe
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Why not "Only I will have decided this week?" I know about solamente and unicamente, but it seems to me like this is a better translation than "But I will have....." 'Only' can also mean "but" or it can mean "just" as in "just one of us" and is also a better option for beginning a sentence. Just my opinion.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Although but and only can be synonyms, if you use "only" in the sense of "but", we spanish speakers will have problems to understand your phrase as we translate "only" as "solo" or "solamente".

In addition, "but" is as good as "only" to begin a phrase. "Don't Begin Sentences with But" is a Writing Myth. See http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/457

0
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estudiantenoe
estudiantenoe
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Great explanation. Thanks!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877Plus
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It at least seems clear that you use the reflexive form when you do NOT have a direct object - "When will you have decided?" "I will have decided this week."

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul598757
Paul598757
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Sort out your syntax. "I will have made my mind up" is correct

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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It is a syntactically correct English sentence, but it is not a correct translation for the given Spanish sentence. Without getting into whether you "can" lead a sentence with a conjunction in either language, you can think of this as a fragment, and make up something meaningful to go before it. I'm sure you didn't complain in earlier lessons when asked to translate "La manzana."

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

A fragment in English is not always a fragment in Spanish.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

By your answer, do you mean "get rid of the word "but?"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HacheEx

Since when is it proper English grammar (aside from street vernacular) to begin a sentence with the word "But," anyway? What is being projected here, a knowledge of educated vocabulary or just a sloppy hack at cheap translating?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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"Don't Begin Sentences with But" is a Writing Myth. See http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/457

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HacheEx

Oh, so since 2002 it is ok. So much for sixty odd years of learning and speaking proper ("american") English among educated people.

Thanks for the heads-up! I've been schooled.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

This is a gray area that brings out a confrontational side of many people. Many linguists maintain that this rule violates how people actually use the language (see adelpine's posting), and therefore maintain that this rule ought to be abolished. Myself, I don't care either way. What's important to me is how the syntax hangs together. In other words, is the sentence capable of being understood in one and only one way? I do know that starting a Spanish sentence with "pero" is acceptable, at least according to the sentences that duo gives us to translate.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexRobles64

"However, I will have decided this week." should be accept.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JDBreeze1

Pero = but. However is better translated as aunque.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/earth2zane
earth2zane
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Can decidir be reflexive?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Yes, but the valid senses are: "5. prnl. Formar el propósito de hacer algo tras una reflexión. Se decidió a salir. 6. prnl. Hacer una elección tras reflexionar sobre ella. Al final se decidieron por la casa más cara."(RAE).

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aniaa.
Aniaa.
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"But I will have decided this week." It isn't really correct in English I think, is it in Spanish?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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As a Spanish speaker, I can tell you that the Spanish phrase is right.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuradKzlay

so "Pero me habré decidido esta semana." has the same meaning with "Pero habré decidido esta semana." ?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No. In the first case, you take an option after thinking over it (I decided for the most expensive one); in the second one, you decide something ("We finally decided after lengthy deliberations").

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuradKzlay

sorry, this is not clear at all. thanks for your answer but your examples are irrelevant and making it harder to understand for me. let me clarify my question.

what is the exact traslation of these two sentences:

1) "Pero me habré decidido esta semana." 2) "Pero habré decidido esta semana."

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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I am a native Spanish speaker, so it was very difficult to answer your question as the difference is in meaning. To show this, I have created two examples. As you can see, the English translation is the same.

Pero me habré decidido (por uno de los candidatos) esta semana -> But I will have decided (for one of the candidates) this week.

Pero habré decidido (la sentencia) esta semana -> But I will have decided (the verdict) this week.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

If I understand you correctly, the first sentence is about making a choice between two things, and the second sentence is about finally making a decision. Did I get it right? By the way, I wish my ability with Spanish were as good as your ability with English ¡Ud. es una linguista! ;^)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Thank you! It took me years of study and practice!

You were almost right. In the first sentence, you can choice between SEVERAL things. In the second one, you will take a decision this week.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Don't you use "shall" any more? But I shall have decided... For the first person (singular and plural) it should be "shall", but my answer is "wrong". Is it?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbronso
dbronso
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"Shall" is still used... though less frequently than in the past and more formally than "will." Your answer is technically correct and should be marked as so. Report it to Duolingo so they can add it to the accepted translations.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Thanks alot! Already did.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It depends on the region. "Shall" is used more in England than in the U.S. IMO, your answer is correct.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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Traditionally, the first person uses shall and the other persons, will. However, "An emphatic future tense, indicating volition of the speaker, reverses the two words,...." See https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shall#Usage_notes

0
Reply1 year ago