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"¿Me oyes caminar en la noche?"

Translation:Do you hear me walk at night?

5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/acfabro
acfabro
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There was another question that used "...en las noches" which also translated to "at night". So when should you use "en la noche" instead of "en las noches"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cherryoak
cherryoak
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I'm not exactly sure how to explain it but "en la noche" would be for all nights, not a specified amount of nights. "en las noches" would be used for a specified amount of nights. (If it's every night or a routinely habit use "En la noche")

For example: "I can't sleep at night." is "No puedo dormir en la noche." because it happens all the time.

"I can't sleep at night when it's cold." is "No puedo dormir en las noches que hacen frio." because not every night is cold.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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I agree . I lost a heart because "en las noches" is "at night" . There's some inconsistency here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FMcD
FMcD
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Bin you hear me walking..? What's this new word that I've encountered more than once? Bin?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

System error.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katetuite

is there a trick to figuring out whether it is the past tense, present or infinite?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I find that its a good habit to look at the conjugation charts for the verbs everytime a new one is introduced or you don't remember which tense is which. As for infinitive they will end with 'ar, er, and ir'. No quick and easy tricks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

Actually there are some good tricks/rules! Now there ARE irregular verbs that don't follow these rules BUT, most verbs do.

So the short answer is that the endings on the verbs will tell you not only WHO the verb is talking about but WHEN.

This will be kinda long but I hope it helps!

Trick number one has to do with some basic pronunciation that has to do with all spanish. It has to do with the emphasis. In ALL of spanish the syllable that is emphasized depends on the end of the word. If it ends in N, S, or ANY vowel then the stress is on the second to last syllable. If it ends in anything else then the stress goes on the LAST syllable. Any exceptions to this get marked with the accent which is there to tell you thats where the stress goes!

SO...

Present tense = Emphasis is on the second to last syllable because all regular verbs, in the present tense, end in the letter N, S, or a vowel. When a word ends in N, S, or a vowel the stress goes on the second to last syllable. (irregular verbs, will be marked with an accent which shows where the stress should be)

Past tense = Emphasis in the 'i' and 'he/she/it/you' form is on the very last syllable and it will be marked with an accent because in those forms there is still a vowel at the end which would mean the stress would be on the second to last syllable (see above) and since it isn't following the rule, it gets an accent! The rest of the forms still follow the rule so they don't get an accent.

Infinitive = Emphasis is on the last syllable because infinitive verbs end in the letter R which is neither N, S, or a vowel!

Next we can look at a couple categories of verbs. All infinitive verbs (the to form. To walk, to eat, to see, etc) end in -ar, -ir, or -er. The -ir and -er verbs conjugate the same way. The -ar verbs are similar but slightly different.

So -ar verbs: I'll use Caminar (To walk) and go through the present tense first and the past tense second In the present tense: (and remember when speaking and listening the stress will be on the second to last syllable. I'll use capital letters to show the stress.)

in the I form it ends in O = caMINo in the informal you form it ends in AS = caMINas in the he/she/it/formal you form it ends in A = caMINa in the we form it ends in AMOS = CaminAMos and finally in the they/you all form it ends in AN = CaMINan

And to continue into the past tense:

in the I form it ends in É = caminÉ (see how the vowel at the end gets an accent? Otherwise it would get pronounced caMINe and be confusing) in the informal you form it ends in ASTE = caminASte in the he/she/it/formal you form it ends in ó = caminÓ in the we form it ends in AMOS = CaminAMos (They same as the present tense. You will get the past tense from the context of the sentence) and finally in the they/you all form it ends in ARON = CaminARon

So any regular verb with the -ar ending will conjugate that way The infinitive; To talk = hablAR

In the present tense; I talk = HAblo, you talk = HAblas, he/she/it/you talks = HAbla, we talk = HablAMos, and they/you all talk = HAblan.

And in the past tense; I talked = hablÉ, you talked = hablASte, he/she/it/you talked = hablÓ, we talked = hablAMos, and they/you all talked = hablARon

Make sense?

The -ir and -er ending verbs conjugate just slightly differently. Where the endings for the -ar verbs in the present tense were O, AS, A, AMOS, and AN, you now have O, ES, E, EMOS, and EN. And in the past tense instead of É, ASTE, Ó, AMOS, and ARON we have Í, ISTE, IÓ, IMOS, and IERON.

I'll use Comer (To eat) in the I form it ends in O = COmo in the informal you form it ends in ES = COmos in the he/she/it/formal you form it ends in E = COme in the we form it ends in EMOS = CoMEmos and finally in the they/you all form it ends in EN = COmen

In the past tense in the I form it ends in Í = comÍ in the informal you form it ends in ISTE = comISte in the he/she/it/formal you form it ends in IÓ = comiÓ in the we form it ends in IMOS = comIMos and finally in the they/you all form it ends in IERON = coMIERon

Whew! Hope that helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

WOW, NoctilucaFirefly, I WISH you were my Spanish teacher! You would have been a great teacher (or... maybe you are [a teacher])! Thank you SO much!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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That was beautiful.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VincentZhou

Thank you very much. Muchas gracias.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e-z-duz-it

Thank you so much for this effort on your part. You're a great teacher!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beryllium1
beryllium1
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That was very, very helpful. Thanks so much for writing this out for us!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJH
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Yes, thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eileen635107
Eileen635107
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Wow that was incredibly helpful! Muchas gracias!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Here's a new one... I heard this expression a while ago, though I do forget which sentence. Could this be written also as "¿Me oyes en caminar en la noche?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MohitSoni3

I write " can you hear me walk in the night" and it marks it right. I didnt loss my any heart

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blalasaadri
blalasaadri
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"Do you hear me walk at night?" What a weird sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

, said the ghost in the house

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danvj

Why "Me oyes" instead of "Oyes me"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Object pronouns usually go in front of conjugated verbs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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What happened to Por La Noche? For sentences that make sense and are useful in daily speech, Babbel is a much better choice.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duomylingo69

Said the ghost to the old woman.

5 months ago