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  5. "Kimo is a lively brother of …

"Kimo is a lively brother of a sister."

Translation:He kaikunāne ʻeleu ʻo Kimo.

November 15, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

...(kaikunāne) means brother, and (kaikuahine) means sister. However, ... these terms apply specifically to the brother of a girl, or the sister of a boy.

This means that if you are a boy and want to refer to your brother , you need to identify whether he is your older brother (kaikuaʻana) or younger brother (kaikaina). ...the same terms are used to identify the older and younger sister of a girl. (Page 179, Hawaiian Language Fundamentals ʻŌLELO ʻŌIWI, Hōkūlani Cleeland)

kaikunāne = brother of a sister

link: https://manomano.io/definition/12291


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Wow, can we make this more complicated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ctxkh1Me

In other languages, absolutely! You have not lived until you've learnt the word for the children of your mother's elder brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Yikes, what language is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ctxkh1Me

For me, High Valyrian, which is based on an Iroquois kinship model and employs relative age. But from what I've heard, it has nothing on Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Before I noticed the part about Kealoha and Komo (good clue!) I was wondering what the difference between kunāne and kaikunāne was, because they were both "brother or male cousin of a female"... Now I see they are variations: kunāne —  Pukui-Elbert,   Haw to Eng,  n. Brother or male cousin of a female, usually used only as term of address or as an affectionate variation of kaikunāne. (PPN tu(o)ngaʻane).

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